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Top 10 Misconceptions About Cancer

Cancer is a class of diseases in which a group of cells display uncontrolled growth (division beyond the normal limits), invasion (intrusion on and destruction of adjacent tissues), and sometimes metastasis (spread to other locations in the body via lymph or blood). These three malignant properties of cancers differentiate them from benign tumors, which are self-limited, and do not invade or metastasize. Most cancers form a tumor but some, like leukemia, do not. This list looks at 10 common misconceptions about cancer.

10

One Cancer Only

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Misconception: All cancers are the same.

Probably the biggest cancer misconception because the “Cure for Cancer” slogan makes people assume it is essentially one drug that will fix one illness. There are over a hundred types of cancer and they are all approached differently, depending on how much knowledge is known about the specific cancer and also depending on the patient’s specific needs. Thanks to the fund raising efforts of organizations such as Susan G. Komen and Avon, Medicine has made great advances in breast cancer research. Others, like pancreatic and esophageal cancers, are relatively out of the spotlight and as such, much is still being discovered and survival rates are still comparatively low.

9

The Cure For Cancer

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Misconception: There is no cure.

It gets a bit confusing because we delve into technicalities but while the disease is incurable so far, the individual cancer patient can be cured. So while it’s technically true that cancer as a broad topic isn’t curable, it’s also horribly wrong and very much false to tell someone they can’t be cured of their cancer. There is a cured status, so as far as individuals are concerned, there is a cure for their cancer. Remission is the first five years immediately after diagnosis. If, after treatment and after those five years, there is no recurrence of the cancer, then the patient is declared cured. Certain types, like skin cancer, are curable by simply removing the tumor. While childhood leukemia and breast cancer are incurable as a disease, 80-90% of patients undergo successful treatments, become cured, and can live relatively normal lives.


8

Cell Phone Dangers

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Misconception: Cell phones cause cancer.

This is a misconception that is has no definite answer but the general consensus is that it is false. Fact of the matter is that cell phone technology is advancing rapidly and they now contain far less carcinogens than their predecessors. Studies on the correlation of cell phones to brain cancer are difficult to determine because it’s hard to accurately document such a study, however, the most recent attempt was done by the Danish Cancer Society and they have found no link between cell phones and brain cancer.

7

Cancerous Lumps

Cancer Cell, Breast.Jpg

Misconception: Any lumps or large masses detected during cancer screenings are cancerous.

Not every abnormality is an automatic cancer diagnosis. It could just be a cyst that would either reabsorb itself into the body or need to be surgically removed. Some tumors are benign, meaning they are non-cancerous, however, determining which are benign, pre-cancerous, and cancerous is why screenings are important.

6

Artificial Sweeteners

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Misconception: Artificial sweeteners cause cancer.

This is a misconception that has regularly shown up in news headlines since the 1970s because of a 1969 study on the effects of cyclamate on mice. It was later disclosed that the mice had been given the cyclamate equivalent of 800 cans of diet soda per day for several weeks. No studies observing moderate amounts of artificial sweeteners have shown that it can lead to cancer. Artificial sweeteners are discussed because it is the most prevalent food myth but it applies to many other kitchen goods from coffee to broccoli to even water (specifically the fluoride content in water). Just as in the artificial sweeteners situation, too much of anything could lead to cancer, but it requires an excessive amount of the product to be potentially hazardous.

5

Positive Attitude

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Misconception: All you need to beat cancer is a positive attitude, not treatment.

A good attitude does wonders to help alleviate the gravity of the situation. That’s why so many members of the cancer ward medical staff have a very pleasant demeanor. It certainly helps that the patient can maintain a positive outlook throughout treatment. However, cancer is much more than “mind over matter” and thus far, western medical research has provided the only avenue that has been repeatedly and comprehensively studied and consistently proves to be the most effective treatment against cancer.


4

Surgery Dangers

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Misconception: Surgery could cause cancer to spread throughout the body.

This myth probably originated decades before, when physicians could only diagnose the most advanced stages of cancer and surgeries were exploratory. Cancer treatment was still pretty rudimentary and without modern machinery, there was no way to fully determine if every cancerous cell was removed. Equipment has vastly improved since then and can provide a much clearer picture of what needs to be done during surgery.

3

Breast Cancer

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Misconception: Only women get breast cancer.

Women are 100 times more likely to get breast cancer than men but since men also have breast tissue, it is still possible for them to develop breast cancer. The American Cancer Society states that roughly 2000 men are diagnosed with breast cancer every year.


2

On the Rise

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Misconception: The prevalence of cancer is on the rise.

It’s true that there are more cases of cancer than in the past but it doesn’t take into account many other factors, such as increased population and longevity (risk for certain cancers increase with age). When compared to populations of the past, there is actually a decrease in the risk of cancer. This misconception may be prevalent simply because the topic is no longer taboo and people hear about it more often than they did in the past.

1

Withheld Cure

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Misconception: Medical science already has and is withholding a cure for cancer.

Conspiracy theories abound and like many other conspiracy theories, this one is false. The Hippocratic Oath is taken to save lives, which a cure for cancer would surely do. If that weren’t enough, then surely no one would believe a pharmaceutical company wouldn’t want to be the first to claim ownership of a cash cow like the “Cancer Cure.” There was an article published recently of a drug that has been tested on four dogs and cured all four dogs that had cancers previously thought to be too advanced to be treated. With a few more successful cases, researchers will soon be allowed to see if this drug could yield similar results in human testing.

Listverse Staff

Listverse is a place for explorers. Together we seek out the most fascinating and rare gems of human knowledge. Three or more fact-packed lists daily.

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  • deeeziner

    Also, wouldn't the proof for item 1 as a myth be item 10?

    If there is over 100 different types of cancer, wouldn't there need to be over 100 different cures? That is a lot of cures being kept secret. ( if they existed in the 1st place)

    100 Wonder drugs would hardly be non-profitable, if marketed.

    • tyla

      actually there was this guy in nz who was cured by the very thing doctors didnt want him to have look him up if you can sorry i dont remember his name

  • akino

    yeah. number 8 is interesting.

  • Hillery

    My cousin, Kay, developed breast cancer in her late twenties back in the 50’s. After a mastectomy, she was fine and has been ever since, still alive fifty years later. Almost every member of my family has had a cancer of one sort or another, but it has never been a cause of death. Always makes me think of the hope in a cancer diagnosis- it’s not always a death sentence by a long shot.

  • DC

    I’ve never heard of number 1 but it’s definitely reassuring that if I ever get cancer it could probably be cured. Unfortunately though the only people I knew who had cancer were terminal…sorry didn’t mean to depress anyone

  • Hillery

    DC- Phew! What contrast a comment apart! I do think it may run in families…. My side is never hit hard, everyone on my friend’s side is terminal. It’s difficult. In my family, they treat it like no big deal, but acting that way to others seems disrespectful.

  • Travis

    Picture #3 made my day… thats how sad my life is!!!

    If its true that there’s a cure I wish they could just come out with it!!

  • pinkbiscuits

    hillery – if a family member has cancer you are more at risk, but it isnt genetic.
    some one diagnosed and cured of cancer is more at risk of caner in the future, but doesnt mean they will get cancer again
    thanks gabi :-) i’m working hard here in the uk to raise awareness of the symptoms of different types of cancer, hving missed all mine until it got quite advanced.

  • oohhhh nnoooeeeesss

    Cancer Treatment Profit > cancer cure profit

  • deeeziner

    Item #2–Perhaps other contributors to the myth that cancer is “on the rise” is that there is a larger and wider reaching medical community (Hence more sources for statistics to be gathered), and that modern diagnostic tools have become more able to detect cancers.

    Item #1–I cannot believe that the medical community that has to witness firsthand the suffering that cancer wreaks would allow a cure to remain secret. As mentioned, the Hippocratic Oath maintains that a doctor shall do no harm, and to knowingly withhold a cure would be contrary to that oath.

    Thank-you Gabi for the informative list.

  • H3000

    You guys… you know what I just realized..

    I REALLY hate cancer.

  • Hillery

    @pinkbiscuits- Don’t worry, I know. It is important to know your family’s health history (which is why I know about my cousin’s from fifty years ago….). In addition, regardless of history, regular screenings are important. It’s strange this persistent attitude that it can’t happen to you, when chances are quite good it will. 1 in 3 these days, I believe…

  • nuriko

    another great list! thanks for the info!

  • katerina

    Misconception: Surgery could cause cancer to spread throughout the body.

    This is not a misconception at all. The part “throughout the body” is indeed exaggerated, but all the rest can be true. It is well known that during surgery, even when “modern machinery” is used, it is impossible to say that ALL cancer cells are removed. “a much clearer picture of what needs to be done during surgery” does not mean that during surgery every single cell is targeted and destroyed. Apart from that, another important aspect is the fact that the peritumoral tissue, includes cells that are not fully transformed into cancer cells but alterations caused by their environment lead them in an intermediate phase. These cells can do a lot of harm when a simple infection during surgery is caused. When an infection occurs, our body reacts and sends inflammatory cells and chemical compounds to “fight” the foreign body (e.g. bacteria). It has been proven (numerous publications in scientific journals can confirm it) that mediators of inflammation can cause angiogenesis and metastasis by altering the fate of cancer cells or pre-cancerous intermediates. Finally, according to the new “trend” in cancer research there is a group of cancer stem cells, hidden in a niche. If these cells are not removed -which can easily be the case since they are not abundant- they can cause the formation of a new tumor which could easily be more aggressive and resistant to previous thertapeutic agents

  • ames801

    Interesting list. It just happens that my aunt is having radiofrequency ablation this morning. Her doctors found a spot on her lung about 4 weeks ago. I haven’t researched this procedure too much but from what I understand it’s fairly “new”.
    You’d think a thing like that happening in my family would help me stop smoking…:( sadly it hasn’t yet.

  • Nameless

    @ pinkbiscuits: I beg to differ, but some types of cancer are most definitely genetically inherited. Retinoblastoma has both inheritable and non-inheritable forms; some types of colon cancer are also inherited (Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also known as Lynch syndrome). Furthermore, even the tendency to developing some forms of cancer can be inherited (for example, BRCA1 and 2 genes are responsible for heightened susceptibility in some women to both breast and ovarian cancer; famous actress Christina Applegate has recently undergone a double mastectomy after discovering that she’s carrying one of these defective genes http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Applegate#Breast_cancer ).
    @ katerina: some invasive procedures, such as TruCut biopsies of some particular types of cancer (especially hepatocellular carcinoma) may indeed “seed” some cancer cells that will later develop metastases on the skin, where the TruCut needle was inserted, which is why these biopsies should always be done cautiously.

  • katerina

    this is one nice example then :) thank you

  • Maximuz04

    I actually believed #6 (passively) since I heard this when i was young. Good to know, I will tell my diabetic dad that its ok :)

  • scrumpy

    What a great list. Well done!

  • lostatsea1

    I got cancer several months after being hit by a car on my bicycle and firmly believe that the trauma and shock weakened my immune system enough to allow cell mutation. The cure is as bad as the disease as radiation or chemo kills all cells.

  • lola

    This list is mostly all completely wrong, there is a study to back up absolutely everything, (say smoking is healthy). I have been an oncology patient, and am well informed, this list, should be removed, as not enough research has been undertaken, to make such large statements.

  • Sotexson

    I personally believe there’s a conspiracy among the medical community not to find a cure. Just think of all the jobs and money related to cancer research that would disappear if a cure was found.

  • lostatsea1

    21.Sotexson:

    Rick Simpson Story After a serious head injury in 1997, Rick Simpson sought relief from his medical condition through the use of medicinal hemp oil …
    video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-7331006790306000271

  • Shagrat

    Sorry Gabi 319 – you were doing SO well until you declared no.#5 a myth – it is NOT. Ask ANY Oncologist or Oncology nurse or worker and they will tell you without fail that any patient who approaches his or her treatment with a positive attitude is FAR more likely to have a better response to treatment than one who doesn’t.

    As a paramedic I saw the difference between poor attitude v/s positive attitude affecting response rates: twice I saw (and we regularly transported the same people to and from clinics) patients with a milder form of a cancer cark it while another with the SAME cancer and pronounced virtually incurable- reach remission status.

    My wife workd for The Cancer Council and the nurses, doctors, professors and ‘survivors’ have all said exactly the same thing: a positive attitude won’t cure you or get you into remission – – – but it woill go a LONG way to allowing your treatment to help you get there.

    On a personal note; a close mate had Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL). The sub-group which presents with this form of the disease for their demographic are Vietnam Veterans and their children/partners/grandchildren – and ALL of them came into contact with Agent Orange while “in country”. NHL is vicious and tends to kill the most robust of its victims within 3-5 years: Graham, who had the most positive attitude I haver EVER seen in any oncology patient: bar none – fought the bloody thing for 14-and-a-half years. And he crawled up off what appeared to be (at the time) his death bed 4 times (even his specialists had given up on him)! It was his 5th ‘flat-line that got him!

  • oouchan

    I only knew of a few of these as being false already. Glad to know about the sugar one. Not that it matters to me…I happen to be allergic to all synthetic sugars….but it was nice to know. :D
    Great list, gabi!

    6 pinkbiscuits: Glad to see you keeping your spirits up. Hope that gabi’s list might have put some of your fears to rest. Hang in there, dear!

    20 lola: Just wondering what part/parts of this list are wrong?

  • deeeziner

    24 oouchan–have you checked into “Truvia”? From what I understand it is NOT a synthetic sugar, but derived from the natural herb-Stevia.

    If you have tried it, can you share your experience?

  • peri1020

    @20 Lola, that’s a pretty large statement you’re making yourself. Do you have anything to backup your position, besides being a patient? Perhaps you’re reading the “Misconception” statement as a fact instead of the misconception that it is?

  • Bobby

    Number one can be true as cancer is a huge moneymaker. Why would they want to cure it when people keep putting in money for a cure?
    Some of the “facts” in this one are opinions.

  • oouchan

    25 deeeziner: Sorry, but I have never heard of that. I wonder where I can get it to try some.
    When splenda came out I was very excited because that meant I could use that in place of real sugar. (it’s a bitch being allergic to diet food when you are trying to lose weight!) I was almost rushed to the hospital because my tongue swelled up. It went down almost immediatly but it was enough to scare the pants off me.
    I will have to do some research on the breakdown of truvia before I tackle it. I don’t want a repeat.
    Thanks for the heads-up!

  • lostatsea1

    24.oochan: There are over 92 different health symptoms associated with aspartame consumption. It seems surreal, but true.
    http://www.sweetpoison.com/aspartame-side-effects.html
    25.deeeziner: 29 Feb 2000 … “I wonder if we could find out more about stevia,” Ross says. “Is it truly a pure herb and are there long term side effects?” …
    http://www.cbc.ca/consumers/market/files/food/stevia/
    6.pinkbiscuits: Have to agree with Shagrat..you must believe you will beat that pesky bug..positive attitude is the most important component of any cure..sorry gabi319! but the jury is still out on many of your ‘facts’.

  • lostatsea1

    28.oouchan: Stevia is used world wide with few if any side effects and can be found in any good health food store. My favorite sweetener is honey. side note..if I had your mailing address, I could mail you the Now magazine with all the upcoming Pride news.

  • deeeziner

    Truvia–

    http://truvia.com/made-from-plants.html

    This seems to be the homepage for the product with FAQs, and a zipcode based locator of markets that sell the product.

  • GTT

    gabi:

    Great list!!

    #5: Though I agree that a positive attitude is not ALL you need to beat cancer (and other ailments) it does go a long way to helping your body cope and beat the disease. I dont know if it´s just me but every time I get down about something it´s like my immune system shuts down and I get sick. The reverse is also true! :)

    #1: To all people who believe in this conspiracy theory, do you really think that there are hundreds (if not thousands) of doctors who would keep quiet about this? Let´s not even mention the Hippocratic Oath, just plain human decency when seeing people suffer and waste away from this disease?

  • lostatsea1

    32.GTT: Only one of my Onclogists agreed with my accident trauma causing cancer, and only off the record. There is peer pressure to not rock the boat.

  • lostatsea1

    Woops! Oncologist.. great list as always gabi!

  • Buffilax

    Screw cancer, i have to take a bunch of summer classes classes for the whole semester i missed during chemo, but at least I have my hair back now

  • lostatsea1

    Cannabis Cures Cancer – “Run From The Cure” The Rick Simpson Story – 58:01 – Mar 7, 2008. Rick Simpson – cannabisculture.com/articles/5169.html …
    video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-7331006790306000271

  • oouchan

    29 lostatsea1: Aspartame is the one that will kill me. I had a very small dose when I was younger (chewing gum) and ended up not breathing. NOT good stuff at all!

    lostatsea1 & deeeziner: Thank you. I will look at both and see if either of them work….or at least don’t kill me. :D

  • EricB

    Totally disagree with #1. Maybe we haven’t found the cure yet, but the business men in charge of the pharmaceutical companies DID NOT take any Hippocratic Oath…

    There’s no money in a “cure.” A “cure” you pay for one time, or maybe a series of times, and the cancer or whatever else the person may be suffering from is gone. The real money is in temporary fixes that people (or filthy rich insurance companies) need to keep paying for again, and again, and again.

    This was a few years ago when I was still in High School, but I recall reading an article in a magazine about an old drug that showed good progress against cancerous cells. However, further research wasn’t being done because for whatever reason (I didn’t quite understand why at the time and can’t recall now) but that drug wasn’t patent-able so the pharmaceutical companies wouldn’t make much money by researching it further.

    It is my personal belief that, if we wanted to cure cancer right now and money was no object, we could do it. Look at what we did in order to develop the a-bomb during WW2. We locked some of the nation’s (and even a few of the world’s) greatest minds in the desert for a while and managed to invent a weapon capable of leveling entire cities in a relatively short amount of time. If we tried to do the same thing with a cure for cancer and put the brightest minds on the case armed with all of the best research and studies and supplies we have at hand, I think it could be done.

  • lostatsea1

    37.oouchan: I have a facebook link with segues, perhaps you might join us.. silly me! you can probably google Now Magazine Toronto for info on Pride.. save postage that way!
    ;)

  • Rascalian

    if doctors really gave two shits about their patients why does it cost over a $1k just to get a check up after spending most of that time filling of paper work? Why do doctors charge so much for their “services”? If they really cared then they wouldn’t be driving mercedes and sailing in their yachts. I’m not saying all doctors are like that but the ones who make all the big decisions do and I don’t find it hard to believe that would withold information on cures for all sorts of things. There have been many many cases of natural cancer cures being brought to the attention of doctors who wanted nothing to do with them. Anyone one who thinks that doctors are a bunch of selfless humanitarians is naive. Yes, I don’t trust doctors, never have never will, thanks to 6 family members dying after suffering at the hands of these “good willed” surgeons. More like butchers. Very oppinionated list.

  • scrumpy

    you conspiracy theory wackos are making this an enjoyable Friday afternoon!

  • lostatsea1

    38.EricB: You hit the nail on the head!! Big Pharma can’t make money on herbal remedies. I have a close friend who underwent rad, chemo and surgery many times and basically was written off. I saw a skeletal woman regain health and vitality through Ayurvedic healing..so who’s right?

  • lostatsea1

    41.scrumpy: I hope you never have to suffer from the after effects of Western cancer treatments as I have..so until you do STFU!

  • oouchan

    39 lostatsea1: Hey…I’m in the forums. Send me a private message there and I will send you my facebook invite.

    Also, as much as conspiracy theories make me retch…this one is closer to the truth. Only because I have seen it first hand. NOT meaning that they are withholding a cure, but that research is dropped not ONLY for funding but because no money will be made from it. How sad.

  • gabi319

    23. Shagrat:
    You misinterpreted that item. I said a good attitude certainly helps. I even believe it is crucial as a SUPPLEMENT to cancer treatment, however, it is not effective as the *only* source of treatment. Unfortunately, some believe the Power of Positive Thinking and other passive forms of treatment to be enough even though it hasn’t scientifically proven that it can be.

    35. Buffilax:
    Glad to hear you’re through with treatments (I assume so at least) and that your hair is growing back! Did it stay the same? My mother’s hair was stick straight prior to treatments and my aunt’s was incredibly curly. After their respective treatments, my mom’s hair is now curly and my aunt’s is straight!

    oouchan:
    I’m not a fan of sugar myself (no medical reason, simply personal preference) and prefer Agave Nectar if I want something sweetened. Maybe an option for you? Naturally created and has a lower glycemic index than natural sugar. A bit pricier but like I said, I don’t want that much sugar anyway! I’m a salt-tooth rather than a sweet-tooth.

    Thank you for putting this up, Jamie. Excellent timing with putting this list up, as well. Tomorrow (June 6th) is the Susan G. Komen National Race for the Cure in Washington, D.C. A number of my friends and I will be racing and volunteering for the event. My first time was last year and it was great. If any of you are in the area (or are willing to roadtrip to the area!), definitely check it out.

  • lostatsea1

    44.oouchan: Thanks. Haven’t tried the forums. :)

  • oouchan

    45 gabi319: Thanks. I didn’t know there were other options. I thought I was stuck with sugar or nothing at all. It sucks trying to buy gum. I am stuck with 1 type.

    So thanks gabi, lostatsea and deeeziner for giving me some alternatives.

    46 lostatsea1: You should…it’s a great place and the people are nice. So many things to try. Hope to see you there!

  • lostatsea1

    45.gabi319: One benefit was I didn’t need to shave for a while! The hair I lost on nape of neck grew back curly and black instead of the gray which covers my head!

  • gabi319

    lostatsea:
    Yes, treatment may be rough – some more so than others depending on their particular treatment – but the thing is you’re still alive today. If left unchecked, that area that was affected seemed to provide a lot of nutrition for these cancerous cells to thrive. It would be no real effort for me to believe that, if left unchecked, your tumor would have greatly increased in size and the situation would be far different now. Yes, you know about Ayurvedic healing *now* (not even addressing its potential because I haven’t even looked into it yet) but did you during your diagnosis? Would there have been time to find such an obscure treatment in a timely fashion?

    Yes, there is some validity to some alternative treatments, however, there are also a lot of crazy, get-rich-quick schemes seeking only to take advantage of someone naive enough to believe in them. My issue with alternative treatment is that it is the umbrella term for a very large, very vast, and very diverse field and we have not been able to determine which is valid and which is not. More importantly, which is SAFE and which is not.

  • lostatsea1

    49.gabi319: Mine (Squamous Cell Carcinoma) had progressed to stage 2, so no time to think of anything else at the time. It was only after the fact that I started to do research. Cancer is a huge money maker, so many Quacks have rushed in to claim cures.
    I lost my taste buds, saliva glands and have Osteoradionecrosis in my jaw that may require a bone graft from my leg!

  • CT

    I’m a med student and I have an exam on Tuesday that includes cancer. Just to make it clear cancer is a genetic disease (because it most definitely involves genes being screwed up) but only SOME cancers are inherited. Also take note that inheritance is also a risk game, depending on what type of gene it is (dominant or recessive) and how many copies of the mutated gene you inherit from your parents.

  • shaunduke

    #9 is incorrect. I’m a cancer survivor and there is NO cure for cancer. Even after those five years your cancer can still return. They use that five years as a definer on the likelihood that the cancer WILL return. If you survive those five years without recurrence, then it’s not likely that it will return until a distant period of time, in which other cancers or the one you already have may arise. But you’re not “cured.” Your cancer can actually return at any point, but it is simply unlikely. Big difference.

  • zululand

    Great list gabi319 – my Mom suffered big time with breast cancer in the 70s – removed the breast – cemo every other week she was never the same after that.

  • redcaboose

    Informative list, Gabi. Thanks. I learned a lot. I go to the VA hospital a lot (the Veterans Admin here in the US) for reasons other than cancer. But I see a lot of cancer patients there. I would guess that most are due to many years of smoking, exposure to nuclear material, or agent orange. I even saw one patient with a hole in his throat, putting a cigarette in the hole to smoke. That cured me of smoking about 15 years ago.

    As far as number 1, I had not ever heard this before, but I am not surprised. A certain part of the population believes every conspiracy theory that comes along. I do not believe them simply because such large groups of people can not keep their mouths shut for that many years. Of course, if there was a cure, the company would make a bundle. DUH!!

  • lostatsea1

    54.red: Guess you haven’t read the posts..DUH! Some do research before ascribing to a particular conspiracy ..others blindly follow!

  • Sarah

    I don’t know if the 80-90% cure statistic is true for both breast cancer and childhood leukemia. did you mean to say it for just childhood leukemia? I may not have been keeping the best track here, but I’m pretty sure survival rates for breast cancer aren’t quite that high yet. My mother died of breast cancer about eight years ago after battling it for 6 and a half years. She also underwent a masectomy.

  • GTT

    OK, as an afterthought for myth #1:

    I do think that many prospective treatments may not be fully reserched because the proyected earnings do not justify the investment. Remember, pharma companies are FOR-PROFIT at the end of the day and it is just not good business sense to invest in something that will not give you a return on that investment.

    It is up to governments and NON-PROFIT organizations to investigate the viability of these types of treatments such as natural herbs and others that cannot be patented and protected.

    That said, I do not believe that someone somewhere has a tested, viable CURE already developed that they are with-holding from the public.

  • Lifeschool

    Goood afternoon all. What an interesting list! I love lists which try to open or broaden folks awareness; if not by the list itself, but because we are actually talking through things in the comments. As one poster said, a very short time ago (70’s, 80’s?) the whole ‘c’ word was taboo – which didn’t help awareness one jot! Now we have made an advance.

    Ok, first of all – nice graph jamie. If you’re peeking in – where did that come from? Without any references I don’t know what the diagram is in reference TO. It would appear that lung cancer is in the very smallest bracket?

    #14: ames: Smoking in regards to cancer can be a double-edged sword. In one sense smoking has been proven (by some, again) to stimulate the immune system of the person, which can help fight disease. It can also interfer with the growth of Kaposi’s sarcoma (a type of cancer of the lymphatic endothelium). There was a list point about it last year (10 things that are surprisingly good for you). On the other hand, smoking has also been proved (by some) to increase the risk of some cancers. From my point of view, every-body is different.

    #23 shagrat: – I couldn’t agree more. If you believe something is true, then it becomes true for you – and you can flesh out your reality within your own mind. I have seen this so many times, and have experienced it myself. If someone firmly believes they are a gonner, a no-hoper, then that reality sends signals throughout the body to reinforce those conditions. On the other hand, if a person believes it is within their power to do something about it, they can stir up a f*cking massive shit storm within themselves; as the body moves to reinforce those conditions. The misconception perhaps is that a cancer patient has no control over their OWN fate; on the contrary – the real buck stops with YOU.

    Are you gonna give up??? Studies have shown that cases are many times more likely to pull through if they have something (or more often someone) to pull through for. Then, if it often the partner or the children who become the deadliest weapons of all.

    #47 oouchan: I also use honey for everything… is honey ok for you… ..honey? ;)

  • TEX

    gabi – good list
    I see a lot of nit picking and it’s mostly garbage.

    My nit pick – change #10 to #1 – I believe until people are educated about the genetics involved in cancer, both hereditary and mutagenic, and the myriad of causes for malfunctions in cell division, cancer will be treated as some mysterious unknown (some people whisper the word cancer – like saying it will evoke evil!)– far from it. Complex, yes, but thousands of conscientious researchers have spent thousands of hours working on the intricacies of these diseases. A foreknowledge of the disorder would head people in the right direction from the beginning and hopefully away from pseudo treatments, fake “cures”, and shameless profiteering quacks.

    As for the non-argument about #5, positive attitude, may I state the obvious, any severe medical condition requires this. Hell, anything difficult thing you do in life requires a positive approach – DAAAA!

    But I believe your point is, “cancer is much more than “mind over matter”” (double quotation marks – what to do?), absolutely correct. Attitude is very important, but not more important than understanding what is going on at the cellular level, and how the treatments are supposed to affect those cells growth, and all the side effects that those treatments can cause.

    Allow me to give you a negative example of “mind over matter” pertaining to cancer –
    I was watching the tube yesterday a.m. (before this list I might add) and an ad came on for one of those cancer treatment centers that keep popping up. There were three women shown in sequence, an older lady, a mid-aged, and a younger girl, talking to themselves – no wait – they were talking to cancer! They were looking at themselves, at there bodies, and saying “now you go away you awful thing”, ‘go away, I’m in control here, not you” and crap like that! I was shocked – I saw it for what it was – superficially it was all positive, and the ad ended with all of them hugging and smiling – in reality they were personifying cancer!!! They were acting like a group of mindless malignant cells was an entity that could be controlled, ordered around, banished by a person willing them away!!! If you don’t see the great danger that well…

  • lostatsea1

    58.Lifeschool: So true, my partner could not handle it and was a total pain in the ass..you would have thought she was the one going through it!

  • deeeekay

    Excellent list Gabi! And thanks for posting it Jamie!
    Some of you are, I think, missing the point of some of these. While it’s true that pharm-companies could make more money from the treatment than a “cure,” I see no way that a “ready to go” cure could stay hidden. Too many of the doctors & researchers would come out with the info.

  • Maggot

    Interesting and informative list, gabi. As usual, coming from you! I agree with TEX about the nit-picky criticisms, it’s obviously not intended as a be-all-to-end-all dissertation, but hopefully will inspire further explorations into particular areas of interest or by those who are personally affected.

  • segues

    Back in 1992 my dad was diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a rather nasty cancer that, at the time, had absolutely no cure and very little treatment but palliative. He was dead in six months, although I wished everyday after three months that he’d die in his sleep that day; that’s how bad it was.
    In 1982 my husband (although I did not know him yet), developed cancer of the larynx and tongue. He had his voice box removed along with about a third of his tongue. He took his chemo and radiation, but his Oncologist still gave him a six month survival.
    He poo-poo’d that and went about his life as if nothing had happened.
    Three years later he developed cancer of the jaw on the same side as the original cancer, so much of the jaw was removed, leaving just enough to retain a “normal” profile. Again he went through chemo and radiation treatments, and once again the Oncologist told him to get his affairs in order. That though he got lucky last time, he wouldn’t give him even six months this time.
    “No,” he said,”I’ll be fine”.
    The doctor laughed. “I just bet you will!” And he asked him to speak at some cancer patients survival seminars about the benefits of a good attitude.
    It’s now 2009 and he is healthier than anyone I know. And he still has that positive attitude.
    I have a tumorous disease, but it is non-cancerous. It is extremely rare (1 in 1,700,000), and severely painful), but not, in any way, related to cancer.

  • scrumpy

    43 lostatsea1

    I wasn’t aware that I had to have had cancer to post on this topic. So I won’t “STFU”, if that’s OK with you?

    I have every sympathy with anyone that has been affected by this disease. My grandmother survived breast cancer and my aunt died from pancreatic cancer last year. This however doesn’t make my opinion more or less important than yours!

    However, when people believe that the whole worldwide pharmaceutical business is conspiring to prevent a cure for cancer, I feel a reality check is required.

  • shamzahm

    i love lists about science and misconceptions. so when they are combined, it makes for an awesome list. good job man.

  • TEX

    64 scrumpy
    chill!! – i’m with you on the conspiricy BS

  • scrumpy

    thanks TEX

    I’ve chilled. :)

  • Lifeschool

    If you would allow me, I’d like to just add a little bit. Lets get real just for a second. Mind over matter is essential (if not crutial) to the treatment of any disease – but I don’t think anybody who has commented so far would disagree that it is also essential to take on proper medical advice and care. Complementary therapies can be helpful (I am also a qualified complementary therapist) but honestly, ‘f’ the cost – see a doctor.

    #59: TEX – Great comment – very thoughtful. Part of the danger I myself see in the ad you saw on TV was the ‘It’s all ok now I’m in care’ factor. Sometimes, as soon as a person enters care they pass the buck – ‘oooh, I’m in their hands now’ kinda thing – ‘If I live or die is up to them’. On one hand this can be great to reassure the person and relax their fears. On the other, they can’t afford to relax their immune system for a second – and a nice safe healthcare plan can divert them from fighting it all guns blazing.

  • Andres

    There is a little error: benign tumors CAN be invasive. Desmoid tumors in the external abdominal wall, for example, can invade neighboring tissue, damaging organs and possibly causing death. Desmoid tumors are not considered malignant, however, because they do not metastasize. Please correct me if I’m wrong :)

  • Freshies

    My friends dad is high up in NASA and he doesn’t use a cell phone for more than a few minutes a day. He started to tell us why it will cause cancer but he was speaking another language. Anyways I wouldn’t lead people to believe this isn’t true when people in NASA think it is true. Just becuase who knows what they know.

  • Freshies

    Lola:
    I totally agree.

  • scrumpy

    70 Freshies

    They don’t take cell phones on to the space shuttle either. This is proof that there must be something that NASA are not telling us.

  • gabi319

    Thank you, Tex. Nicely written comment :-)
    I’m actually surprised that this topic, of the myriad of possibly controversial misconceptions, is the dominant argument here! Odd thing is EVERYONE is saying a positive attitude helps but EVERYONE is still arguing about it! As long as you all argue in a positive manner, by all means, continue…

    (double quotation marks – what to do?)
    The internal quote get single quotes while the overall gets doubles.

    56. Sarah
    I’m sorry about your mom.
    The 80% is in reference to childhood leukemia and 90% is to breast cancer. That however can be broken down even further with thanks to the research and advancements within breast cancer research. The range is stage IIA, which has a 92% survivability, all the way down to stage IV, which has a 20% survivability, as according to American College of Surgeons National Cancer Data Base. These are statistics from 2002, so it may be even higher although the most recent news articles say it has not increased by much. The 80% from that item is also in reference to breast cancer. After successful treatment and remission period, the survivability rate of all stages of breast cancer is roughly 80%.

    52. shaunduke – “Your cancer can actually return at any point, but it is simply unlikely.”
    Actually, there’s nothing here to argue because you’ve reiterated my statement. The misconception is that cancer is an automatic death sentence. While serious, there are medical advancements that can give one a sense of normalcy after a successful treatment (normalcy being an extremely relative term).
    Perhaps a weak parallel, but let’s take a look at the common cold. There is no cure for the common cold however, people those infected deal with it and survive. A weak parallel simply because the aggressiveness of the respective diseases is vastly different but it essentially is what I’m trying to convey.

    “in which other cancers… may arise.”
    Then that is a new cancer.

    I’m sorry your oncologist wasn’t one of the more optimistic ones. There *is* a cured status. If you have been cancer-free for five years, your medical papers will have “cured” written on them. Not “prolonged remission”, not “cancer in suspension for indefinite term” but CURED. That is not to say the cured status is absolute – almost nothing in life is absolute and there are situations in which cancer can return. However, as you said (and this statement should be defined more according to the specific cancer and its respective survivability rate) “it is simply unlikely” if addressed with correct treatment and a dedicated series of follow-ups post-treatment.

  • Shanise822

    Do you have a link to the article referenced for myth #1?

  • gabi319

    74. Shanise822
    This wasn’t the original article I read when finding out about it’s still pretty informative:

    http://www.webmd.com/cancer/news/20090323/miracle-dog-beats-aggressive-cancer

    Not to be mistaken with most recent dog cancer news regarding FDA approval of Palladia (just approved two days ago). That addresses one specific type of cancer.

  • robertss87

    I hate to be a disturber of the peace, but I think that something should be cleared up. As you stated, cancer is a disease in which a group of cells grow uncontrollably. As this is not limited to a specific part of the body, and is the result of cell regulation malfunction, it would be impossible to completely eliminate the potential for the disease to occur in a person’s body. The use of the term “cure” as you describe is used by the medical community to indicate a lack of harmful cell replication. It does not indicate that the malfunction has been erased or corrected.

    I realise that this means most ailments cannot be “cured” in the sense that they are eliminated, but I think the distinction is still important. To find a cure for cancer would involve genetic manipulation to eliminate cancer causing abnormalities, which is something that simply cannot be done yet. Anything else is simply a treatment or removal of affected cells.

  • copperdragon

    about this time every year, the grocery stores have little pink donation boxes and Susan Komen Cancer buttons and so on.

    When the ask me to donate, I always ask “where is the testicular cancer donation box”. I just get blank stares.

  • Lifeschool

    73: Gabi319 – I think the ‘positive state of mind’ thing is always well worth thinking about, and I’m so ‘positive’ that so many folks think the same way. I really like that. I didn’t feel we were arguing about it so much as talking it over. It’s been a nice friendly list, and one I hope many will read and take comfort from.

  • Lifeschool

    sorry, that shoulda bin ‘I feel so positive about folks…’

  • pinkbiscuits

    number 6 – all you need to beat cancer is positive attitude not treatment
    did any of you who said this was false bother to read it? gabi never said a positive atittude wont help, she said it shouldnt be used in place of treatment.
    i skipped a lot of comments to type this because i got frustrated, so if anyone has already said anything, sorry for repeating.

  • copperdragon

    pharmaceutical companies and cancer research companies DO NOT have to take a Hippocratic Oath. They are free to pick and choose what they research, promote and sell.

    If money is sent to ABC Research company for cancer research, and they use it to cure baldness – who’s gonna stop them?

  • DiscHuker

    one thing about cancer i have wondered, at least here in america as this is my frame of reference, is…”why is breast cancer so ‘popular’?”

    what i mean is, breast cancer hardly ever causes death and there are many other types of cancer that are way more deadly. as far as i can determine, the only cancers that are less deadly are lip, eye and penis cancer.

    i feel i am not asking the question properly.

    why does breast cancer get so many commercials, fund raisers, 5K runs, telethons, etc?

  • Nicosia

    I have no idea why they bug me so much, but a personal pet peeve of mine is the magnetic ‘awareness ribbons’ people put on their cars. Yes, I am aware of cancer. No, I don’t want a silly pink loop of magnet on my car.

  • lostatsea1

    64.scrumpy: Hey you started it.. calling me wacko!!

  • scrumpy

    84 lostatsea1

    It was #7 oohhhh nnoooeeeesss, #21 Sotexson,#27 Bobby, #38 EricB and #40 Rascalian that I was referring to, not you.

    sorry if I hit the wrong target!

  • oouchan

    58 Lifeschool: Yes. I can have honey, but unfortunatly…I don’t like it. Its icky. I am starting to live without sugar now. *sigh*

    69 Andres: My friend has lymphoangenomy (sp?). Its benign tumors that grow throughout her body. She has 2 in her kidneys, one in her stomach (size of a basketball), 1 in her femur, 1 in her hip and the other in her spine. She has had them removed and also have had them drained…but they keep coming back. They are causing all sorts of issues for her. Mostly pain and inability to walk properly. So yeah…benign tumors are just as bad.

    77 copperdragon: My local grocery store does ALL cancer research donations. At least 1 a month. But you are correct…not enough stores care to go after the other cancers. Just breast cancer. Very sad.

  • merrychristmascharliemanson

    Good list, gabi.
    Another one (I’m not sure if anyone has mentioned this or not, I read the first 30 comments or so…) is that cancer causes people to lose their hair. It seems like it would be common knowledge that this isn’t true, but I know several people who aren’t aware of it. It’s the treatment (specifically, chemotherapy) that causes the hair loss, not the cancer itself.

  • lostatsea1

    85.scrumpy: Oh well..I was a little snarky! ;) mea culpa
    86.oouchan: There are hundreds of different types of honey, go organic girl! Stevia should be fine for you though. I read a book by Professor Ehret ‘The Mucusless Diet’ who likens the body to a plumbing system and posited that buildups in mucus can cause disease. I wondered if your friend with the tumours drank a lot of milk as that can cause excess mucus.

  • Nicosia

    Hmmmm…. Maybe so much time and money is dedicated to breast cancer because men love boobs so much!

  • Maggot

    Nicosia: Maybe so much time and money is dedicated to breast cancer because men love boobs so much!

    Not to make light of a sensitive subject, but that reminds me of the t-shirt (usually seen on overweight, sweaty guys) offering “free breast exams”.

  • Nicosia

    Ew! That’s almost as bad as one I have seen that says “Free Mustache Rides.” The person wearing those type of shirts is NEVER anyone you would want to get it on with :)

  • mom424

    DiscHuker: Because it used to kill lots of women. And because it is not very hard to diagnose or hard to treat if caught early(the aggressive familial strain excepted); breast cancer deaths were/are preventable; and so we did/are.

    FYI we had a huge radio/tv/government sponsored prostate cancer campaign here a few years ago. I think they called it the Bend over and cough campaign. jk, but they did do a great job of explaining the necessity of digital rectal exams. Tried to de-stigmatize the procedure and get people talking/nagging about it.

  • Serious

    When I looked at this list I felt like somebody was either naive or paid off or biased or ignorant or a combination of some or all of them. There are experts of many different disciplines of science who have their own opinion. And it is absolutely mind boggling how many opinions differ so dramatically. And these are the opinions of learned people with a lot of titles behind their names and a lot of publications on their account (most likely lots of money on their account as well …).

    Fact is that many influences can and will cause cancer in it’s various forms. Fact is that many genetic predispositions will make people sensitive to it. Fact is that inflammation seems to be a common trait to (or cause of) cancer. Fact is that no-one has the ultimate answer. Why? Because there is none.

    There are some very proven natural ways of living that will inhibit many forms of cancer and other degenerative diseases and will make a person more likely to live a healthy and fulfilled life. Nutrition, supplements, exercise, avoidance of toxins and elimination, positive mind and psychological disposition etc., etc.; all will contribute to health. It is up to the individual to study and apply these wisdoms to have better health. It is also up to the regulatory agencies to support this kind of approach. Unfortunately, medical science has been found too often to be biased and misinformed, not to speak of conflict of interest. Medical science and practitioners need money just as you and me. ‘Follow the money’ is an old adage. It is very educational when one follows the money in the pharmaceutical business. A lot of research and books were written about it and a lot of facts and speculations remain. Big business has rarely been known to be truly benevolent.
    Overall, this list has a lot of half truths, and I wouldn’t know anybody who could do justice to the topic. It is a valiant attempt, however lacking much value and not very useful to publish.

  • Diogenes

    Concerning Penis Cancer or The Big C’s Big C –

    I’m with yah DiscHuker. We’ll call it The Million Man Penis March to Pennsylvania Avenue. Spreading awareness across our great nation with great speeches given at the Washington Monument , the most famous phallus in D.C.
    I’m sure we could get the Shriner’s to ride around in little wienermobiles at the parades. Who wouldn’t want to sponsor such a glorious cause?
    A castrato would sing our anthem.
    Who’s heart wouldn’t sob with flowing heart tears at such a tragic display of noble defiance?
    Of coarse, dudes would need a recognizable emblem that rivals the pink ribbon. A symbol that states to the world “Penis Power!”

  • lostatsea1

    92.mom424: Here in Ontario we have a mail in colo-rectal smear test, also just had a colonoscopy with no wait time.

  • Kibey

    Some funny jokes about cancer
    http://www.cancerisnotfunny.com/funny.html

  • MarDeck

    #5 is a winner when you add a positive attitude with proper treatment.

    I have known quite a few people some are here, some are not and some stayed a lot longer in part because of their mental attitude.

    There are some friends I have who started drinking a superfood called Limu. It is not a cure for anything, but it’s healthy and some have become healthier and cancer has gone into remission or even gone away upon enjoying the superfood on a daily basis. A link can be found at http://www.mardeck.com It has plenty of fucoidan in the fruit drink. Like I said Limu is not a cure for anything.

    There have been over 700 scientific studies done on fucoidan and the immune system. You can find the results of these tests at http://pubmed.com The limu moui comes from the Tongan Islands and has been ingested as a sea vegetable by the residents of Tonga for over 3,000 years. Tonga has some of the healthiest people in the world.

  • estherlou

    It is very possible to live after having cancer. My mother is 83 years old. She has had a mastectomy, and never had to have any chemo or other treatments after they removed the cancer. She also had colon cancer. They removed the small spot or section, and again never had to have any further treatments. I think this was at least 5 years ago now. Of course, I attribute much of this to many, many people praying in her behalf.

  • bigski

    89-Nicosia~~ That was funny.
    luv black humor.

    94-Diogenes– Very good points.

  • TonyDee

    hahhahahahaha

    “Withheld Cure”

    hahahahahahahah.

    Ever think of this?:

    “A customer cured is a customer lost”

    DON’T be a fool.

  • Tron

    I work in a hospital in DI (diagnostic imaging) so my dept. does xrays, mris, catscans, ultrasounds etc.

    as such I see a fair amount of cancer patients.

    So what always bugs me is we (as a society) see literally HUNDREDS of ads for stopping breast cancer etc. which yea it’s not a good thing (no cancer is).
    But. in women LUNG cancer is the most common lethal form of cancer. and in men it’s prostate cancer.

    there really should just be a giant national charity for ‘cancer’ research. and then let it get divided up into ‘breast cancer’ or lung cancer or skin cancer sections however the researchers see fit.

  • TonyDee

    Cool! I hit the big one, er, do I win something?

    Big pharma is BIG. They do not give a shit about your health but only how fat your wallet is. I read this List and all i think of “shill”.

    Those that look elsewhere and don’t limit themselves to the bullshit peddled by MSM (mainstream media) are the ones that are the biggest threat to Big Pharmas bottom line. It makes sense that those corporations and their paid-off “scientists” make alternative therapies look bad.

    BUT if i see the word “crystal”, “orgonite”, or even “alchemy” I’ll be tempted to kick your ass.

    Artifical sweetners and MSG. Avoid these like the black death. Only brainless idiots (or industry shills) will say these are harmless.

    If you can find foods that are NOT picked early so they have a long shelf life in the supermarket, or even grow your own, or if you find foods that are pesticie free then you WON’T have to worry too much about cancer. Obviously, if you smoke or drink excessive amounts then you deserve to die a painful horrible cancer death.

    You smoke? You = Idiot.

    So, WHO AM I?

    A scientist which deals with biology… and i’ve said too much.

  • I want to know for sure if cell phones cause cancer! in concerned…….

  • christopherstarcarter

    Good Post. I was going to shoot you down if you were going to say someting that wasn’t true. Why? Because I have cancer – Harry Cell Leukemia – was one of only 5 people in the U.S. to have that type of cancer at age 32. Very rare to have it at that age, usually its found in 60-70 year old men. I’m 40 now and its still in remission. As Spock would say “Live Long and Prosper”

  • BooRadley

    I have just hit the five-year mark since I was treated for Endometrial cancer. When it was discovered, it had already metasticised and was so severe that they gave me a 20% chance of living. My oncologist told me she has seen people with good chances of recovery die, and others with very poor prognosis live… she said I had to work to keep a positive outlook and get through the (very harsh) treatment. Well, I was terrified and depressed, but my family and friends rallied round, and they are the ones who got me through. They are the ones who gave me the will to fight to live. So, IMHO, a positive outlook PLUS treatment is the way to go. You need both.

    A lot of my family members have died from cancer – my parents and my older brother, just to name a few – so I know that it is a serious set of diseases, each different, with different treatments and outcomes. As someone mentioned above, there is not just ONE cancer, so there is not just ONE cure. It infuriates me when people say the “cure” for cancer is already known, but this great conspiracy exists to keep it a secret because of money. THINK about this – doctors and researchers have families and friends, too, and I guarantee that they all have had at least one loved one with cancer. Why the hell would they want to withhold this miracle cure from the people they love? Almost all of the medical community that partook in my treatment were wonderful, loving, compassionate people, and it makes me sick to have people insinuate that they allow their patients to suffer needlessly because of greed.

    I also work in a grocery store, and we are required by the company to ask for donations during alternating months. Sometimes it is for breast cancer, sometimes for prostate cancer, somtimes for Special Olympics or The March of Dimes. The following does not apply to the majority of our customers, just to those few rude ones: If you don’t want to donate, PLEASE just politely say no, and spare the poor checkers from your rantings about conspiracies and people deserving to die and the fact that you are healthy so it is no concern of yours. You have a right to your opinion, but just say “No, thank you,” and leave it at that. I can’t help but take the rude comments personally, because my entire family has gone through hell with cancer, and I love them all and I can’t stand to hear their lives being belittled and written off by some ignorant, ranting fool.

    That said, I have been amazed by the kindness of the majority of people who knew I had cancer. It renewed my faith that most people are basically good and want to do the right thing. The generosity of those around me was awe-inspiring.

  • dronedrone

    cell phones are radioactive, the heat can cook the inside of an egg if the egg is near it for about 3 hours, divide 3 hours into 3 half hour phone calls… wow. this list is more suggestive and opinionated as opposed to fact based, i bet the resources are weak. also, splenda is extremely unhealthy and practically illegal to use in germany and some other countries in europe due to its public distribution ban. american dwellers out there avoid aspartame and splenda, its not good for intestinal digestion. aspartame was banned until the reagan administration brought it back into the markets. However, back to the cancer stuff…. i hate the list, some of these “misconceptions” are actual realities that may or may not happen due to both consequences manifesting itself in reality.

  • nikhil12345

    6th is quite absurd n funny!!!! 8th is quite interstin!

  • deeeekay

    I was wondering if you’d bring your story up here Boo, glad to see you did :)

    TonyDee-
    Artificial Sweeteners and MSG for a long and healthy life! Only brainless idiots will say these are harmful!
    How do I know? I’m a scientist!

    C wut i did thar?

    I know it’s been said once, but I want to reiterate that the reason breast cancer is so “popular” is that it’s SO easy to diagnose in early stages with simple exams, yet many women simply avoid the exams. Because of this, women often end up getting diagnosed later, causing treatment to be much harsher than if they had gotten regular exams (for example requiring a full mastectomy instead of simply a lumpectomy had it been found much sooner). I believe also that the increase in talk about breast cancer is a motivational tool. It’s become much less taboo to hear about & talk about, and so it’s becoming easier for affected women (and men! Men get it too!) to live with. Many women have a VERY difficult time handling the loss of one or both breasts (and it is the same I imagine with ovarian or uterine cancer), as they feel they will be viewed as “less female.”

    Also, I sometimes feel like, “who cares” in regards to which type of cancer to donate funding to (I have walked in the Susan G. Komen 3-day in San Francisco, and have made donations to various cancer organizations). If the “popular” or “well funded” researchers find a treatment that works well on that type of cancer, there is a good chance that it may have positive effects on other cancers as well.
    By the way, I know little about other foundations/pharm companies/etc, but I do know that the Susan G. Komen Foundation uses their money not just towards research, but also towards raising awareness and improving access to screenings as well as treatment.

  • chris

    Number 4 is not necessarily a misconception. Cancer usually develops with a main tumor that is able to grow and connect new circulatory tissue. Meanwhile, other smaller and benign tumors can develop. However, the main tumor secretes a chemical that suppresses the smaller growths and prevents them from growing aggressively. Because of this if the main tumor is removed, the smaller tumors are no longer suppressed and can become malignant and spread throughout the body.

  • melodie

    Hmn, there are actually some misconceptions on misconceptions about cancer on this list.

  • whitelunardog

    It’s a zodiac? no? a misconception?

  • lostatsea1

    97.MarDeck: I would add Salba to the list of good food to help the immune system, taken with organic yogurt will give you more anti-oxidents and Omega 3. Reducing carb intake and sugar also will help to starve cancer cells.
    http://www.inspire.com for help with cancer.

  • Marc W.

    This list looks like it was put together by the companies behind radiation and chemotherapy. Western medical philosophy is kill the body and maybe the cancer dies; eastern is poison the milk the cancer feeds on. Our food, our environment, our everyday lives in the US is filled with toxins (Including stress) which weakens the body and aids cancer. Having had family members and friends dies of cancer after going thru western surgeries and poisons I have learned to take much better care of my diet and have exercised regularly (3-5 times a week) for most of my life. IF I should ever come down with cancer no chemo or radiation.

  • Shadow Lord

    Nice pic in #3…>-)

  • dontknow3

    Nice info on topic but for all my cancer patient’s and medical marajuana patient’s we have the right conception which is The Great Volcano Vaporizer. A must have for patient’s my Auntie uses it everyday and was so thankfull I told her about it. Check it out at http://www.dontknow3.com This is a big help in the process also at http://www.dontknow3.wordpress.com God Bless

  • segues

    Andres: Yes, benign tumors can, indeed, grow and invade surrounding tissue. I have a disease which causes benign tumors to grow on nerve roots, nerve sheathes, and peripheral nerve bundles.
    Mine have grown on my spinal cord, bilaterally, from C-1 through S-5. All of the nerve tissue is completely encased in tumor, and over the years some of the tumors have grown sufficiently to deform places on the cord itself. So much for benign, huh?
    I guess the difference, really, is that benign tumors grow extremely slowly and never metastasize. It’s a good difference, one I am happy to deal with even though the disease itself is rather nasty. Still, on a scale of this to actual cancer, I’ll go with this every time.

  • TonyDee

    #108

    Maybe you should read some of my previous posts. You think I wrote that just to sound big? Just in case you havn’t realised yet, the world does not just consist of america. There are other placs which don’t tow the partyline of big corps and *gasp* actually have FDA equivalents which don’t have a revolving door idealism.

    If you think artificial sweetners, artificial favourings, colourings and favour enhancers are kind to the body, then I have prime waterfront estate on Mars I’d like to sell you.

  • Razhell

    Listwriter… Don’t be so naive to think that an “oath” is going to prevent or ensure anything, the higher powers will do whatever the fuck they want, dispite the the rules they created to force us into thinking things like this don’t happen, stating that they can’t….

  • Mabel

    2 Hillery
    You said “It’s not always a death sentence.” True, true.

    My mother had cervical cancer. Still here.
    My dad had a cancerous tumor on his ankle, and had to have extensive reconstructive surgery, including a muscle transplanted to his foot and a skin graft. Still here.
    I’ve know several people who had skin cancers removed. Still here.

    Although one person I knew, who was a friend of a friend, had a lump in her breast and did nothing about it because she was afraid of the doctor. She finally went when she began having intense pain in her back. It turned out that the lump was breast cancer, which had spread to her spine, and she died shortly after. If she had gone to the doctor, they could have removed the lump and given her medication and she would have been fine.

    IF SOMETHING SEEMS NOT RIGHT, GO TO THE FREAKING DOCTOR.

  • lostatsea1

    115.dontknow3: Nice link..try this;
    Cannabis Cures Cancer – “Run From The Cure” The Rick Simpson Story – 58:01 – Mar 7, 2008. Rick Simpson – cannabisculture.com/articles/5169.html …
    video.google.ca/videoplay?docid=-7331006790306000271
    Nice to know brothers that are awake!!

  • lostatsea1

    Dumb white man..humour..
    Indian Chief ‘Two Eagles’ was asked by a white government official,

    ‘You have observed the white man for 90 years. You’ve seen his wars and his
    technological advances. You’ve seen his progress, and the damage he’s done.’

    The Chief nodded in agreement. The official continued, ‘Considering all these
    events, in your opinion, where did the white man go wrong?’

    The Chief stared at the government official for over a minute and then calmly replied.
    ‘When white man find land, Indians running it, no taxes, no debt, plenty buffalo, plenty
    beaver, clean water. Women did all the work, Medicine man free. Indian man spend all
    day hunting and fishing; all night having sex.’

    Then the Chief leaned back and smiled. ‘Only white man dumb enough to think he could improve system like that.’

  • nobody

    #7 has a point, technically, it might be more profitable for drug companies to make drugs that treat cancer but don’t get rid of it, so the treatment continue longer and they make more cash. It is highly improbable that a company could get away with this practice nowadays, but some companies are corrupt enough to at least think of it. The same goes for other diseases.

  • scrumpy

    the conspiracy fools are back :(

  • astraya

    Last night I saw an ad on Australian television for “Go Red For Women Day”, to raise awareness of and funds for research into heart disease in women. (Why just women. Men have hearts, too!) The ad mentioned that 4 times as many women die of heart disease than of breast cancer. (The Australian Bureau of Statistics site has figures that are consistent with that. It also mentions that prostate cancer (men) kills more people than breast cancer (mainly women).)

    The information website for “Go Red for Women Day” is goredforwomenday.(something), which looks like gored-for-women-day. As is “I ran the bulls in Pamplona to impress the Spanish senoritas, and got gored for women”.

  • astraya

    121 lostatsea1
    Dumb white man humour
    Indian Chief ‘Two Eagles’ said … “plenty beaver”

    The white man said: “I have a recipe here for strawberry ice-cream”.

    (see https://listverse.com/2009/03/10/top-10-bizarre-food-ingredients/ if you don’t understand this)

  • lostatsea1

    125.astraya: AHSO! Thanks..I did wonder about the beaver ass juice comments!

  • deeeekay

    Astraya-The likely response to your “why just women?” thing is that Heart Disease is very commonly looked at my most people as being a “Man’s Disease,” when it can be just as-if not more-deadly for women. People are trying to raise awareness that women need to watch their heart health just as much as men do.

  • astraya

    deeeekay: Thanks for that. That makes sense. Maybe the information they provide actually says that, if I’d bothered to look at the website.
    A few weeks ago my wife and I chanced to watch a program about the penis on Australia’s most daring free tv channel. On it, they said that erectile dysfunction is often symptomatic of wider heart/circulatory-related problems in men. In the old days talking to a doctor about erectile dysfunction was about the last thing that men ever did. These days, men seek out doctor’s advice much earlier, as much for dissatisfaction as well as dysfunction ie it’s changed from “can’t” to “can but not happy about it”. As a result, heart/circulation problems in men are being diagnosed and treated much earlier than they used to be.

    lostatsea1: bon appetit!

  • Gismo

    On the day I learn it’s finally safe to drink diet coke I also learn my man-boobs are out to kill me! Why must life always be ups and downs!

  • Essiac

    MYTHS DISPUTED 1. CURE FOR CANCER..ESSIAC..RESEARCH IT 2. ASPERTAME DOES CAUSE CANCER..FDS SECRET REPORT LINKED DIET SODA AS NO. 1 WITH 92 SYMPTOMS 3. CELL PHONES CAUSE BRAIN TUMORS,, I HAD ONE AND IT WAS CURED W/ THE ABOVE-NAMED ESSIAC… SEE HEALTHFREEDOM.INFO. GOD BLESS!

  • deeeekay

    No problem astraya:) Glad I was able to shed some light on the issue, it’s not often I get to act like a bit of a know-it-all around these parts :D
    One of the most dangerous things about heart disease for women is that symptoms of heart attack are much more subtle. In men, every one knows that shooting pain down the left arm, and the feeling that there’s an elephant sitting on your chest means you need to see a doc. For women you see things like fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath…well that could mean you simply took the stairs too fast!

  • gabi319

    93. Serious
    Thanks for starting your comment off with ad hominem. It immediately gives me an indication of how ‘not serious’ I should take your comment, Serious. Ignoring a number of attacks at me over facts that I never mentioned or refuted… one thing you said “Fact is that inflammation seems to be a common trait to (or cause of) cancer.” is WRONG. The cause of cancer is the uncontrolled cell growth. JFrater even says that in the first sentence of the opening paragraph.

    102. Tony Dee
    Not sure where I mentioned MSG but since it apparently makes you think of artificial sweeteners which I did mention, alrighty then… I did say a study showed that artificial sweeteners caused cancer in mice who were given the human equivalent of 800 cans of diet soda per day for weeks. Same problems could present themselves with MSG…meaning excess is bad, but in moderation…??? It excites the nerves cells so those with nerve-related disorders or diseases shouldn’t consume it. And of course, those who are sensitive to it shouldn’t eat it, but ‘certain people shouldn’t eat it’ applies to many other special needs diets. A friend of mine and a former boss both have celiac disease. Just because I know two people who can’t eat gluten does not mean I’ll tell the entire world to avoid bread. You failed to mention that glutamate is naturally created in many foods such as seaweed (which is how MSG was initially extracted), asparagus, tomatoes, cheese, mushrooms, and meat. Our own bodies produce it. Of course, the major concern is that MSG is far purer and therefore possibly more dangerous than the glutamate we produce on our own. That could be a possibility (even though MSG is nothing more than water, sodium and glutamate). However, studies have difficulties recreating the Chinese Restaurant Syndrome effects in the lab. Is it a valid effect of MSG or simply MSG scare-induced paranoia (i.e. a person with an actual sensitivity presents symptoms and those around them believe they also have it)? Could it be hard to recreate because scientists aren’t using ‘normal’ amounts of MSG that most people will use (normal usage being far past the recommended levels)? Jury’s still out on this. One study that added to this MSG scare found that it causes retinal thinning (and eventual blindness) in rats but was later disclosed that these rats were given 20g of MSG in their 100g diet. In other words, an extremely high amount. MSG, like I said in artificial sweeteners above, shouldn’t be taken in excess but it’s up to the individual if they want the little that strict moderation will allow. If you want to avoid it, fine, but since glutamate is naturally occurring in a number of foods you eat and even naturally created in your own body, there’s no way to completely ban it. Here’s hoping you don’t add Parmesan cheese to your spaghetti. Yeah, high levels of glutamate in that. Hopefully your mom had bottle-fed you. Breast milk is comprised mostly of lactose and glutamate. Human breast milk has ten times more glutamate than cows’ milk.
    You don’t believe anything the FDA says? Ok, then there’s this:
    -National Academy of Sciences: Confirms the safety of MSG as a food ingredient. (1979)
    -Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the United Nations World Health and Food and Agricultural Organizations: Designates MSG as safe and places it in its safest category for food additives. (1988)
    -European Community’s Scientific Committee for Food: Confirms MSG safety. (1991)
    -American Medical Association: Concludes that MSG is safe, at normal consumption levels in the diet. (1992)

    118 Razhell – “Listwriter… Don’t be so naïve…”
    Listreader… Don’t be so paranoid.

    130. Essiac
    First things first, turn off the capslock.
    Essiac: systemic review of essiac literature (review found in PubMed)
    “A review of the literature on Essiac and essiac formulations showed a lack of high-quality clinical trials to substantiate any of Essiac’s traditional uses. Weak evidence from preclinical, animal, and laboratory data warranted a discussion regarding Essiac’s use for cancer, but the results are inconclusive. Several other essiac preparations are noted in the literature, adding confusion to the exact formula and its proposed benefits. In general, there is a lack of both safety and efficacy data for Essiac and essiac formulations. Well-designed trials testing Essiac or individual herbal components are necessary to make firm recommendations.”

    From what I’ve seen from pro-essiac forums is that some recommend it not be used as a sole cancer treatment. Main problem I see of it being used as a cancer cure is that there isn’t even a standard essiac tea formula. Some use four herbs and roots, some as many as eight and yet no one is completely certain which specific herbs or combination of herbs helps and which are placebos or flavor enhancers. Look, never have I said alternative therapy is completely pointless. What I have said is there’s SOME validity in SOME treatments but the entire field is so big and unregulated that there’s no way to find the logic or safety around it.

    Do I need to present another study aside from the Danish Cancer Society as well at the two Jfrater mentioned in another list? Alright, from the University of Ibadan in Nigeria (also found in PubMed):
    “The preponderance of published research works over several decades including some with over ten years of follow up have not demonstrated any significant increase in cancer among mobile phone users. However, the need for caution is emphasized as it may take up to four decades for carcinogenesis to become fully apparent.”

    Of course, I fully expect that all I’ve just presented in this comment will be quickly shrugged off as brainwashed pro-Big Pharma propaganda and that all the studies and those who worked on these studies are just as evil. If you want to continue thinking that way, feel free to do so, but please tone down the crazy and at the very least, provide published facts and scientific studies as to why you believe I’m a naïve, lying, brainless industry shill of an idiot and present your rebuttal in a mature fashion (I know, I know… “How can I present published studies when all published studies are purposefully designed to thwart me?!” Not my problem…) As you can see, there are a number of brave cancer patients and cancer survivors who’ve come here and shared some amazing stories of their battles. There are also a number of people who’ve supported them through their battles. None of us need your drama. We’ve got enough of our own to occupy us a good long while.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    “The cause of cancer is the uncontrolled cell growth”

    Errr…no :) Uncontrolled cell proliferation is indeed indicative of cancer, however it is DNA mutation that CAUSES this, thus DNA mutation is the cause of cancer.

    Carry on ;)

  • cymraegbachgen87

    130

    “I HAD ONE AND IT WAS CURED”

    Are you sure. the code of conduct for this site says no prolonged block capitals.

    You are also paranoid, and wrong.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Something I disagree with is the annual “Race for Life” held by Cancer Research UK. It is exclusively for women to raise funds for the charity.

    As said above, men get breast cancer too, but cannot use this very well publicised event to raise awareness and funds for it.

    Sexist and wrong IMHO

  • mom424

    cymraegbachgen – do the men not benefit from the fund-raising? I’m thinking that the funds raised and the new treatments resulting from that benefit all breast cancer sufferers.

    Infection/inflammation is being shown to be a trigger for cancer – buddy didn’t have it all the way wrong. HPV has been shown to cause genital cancer (or to cause the mutation that results in cancer if you prefer), chronic ulcers (caused by bacteria) has been shown to precipitate stomach cancer. My aunt (I realize that this is just anecdotal evidence) who was crippled since infancy had an open wound that was constantly infected – it eventually became cancerous too. Took 20+ years but it did happen.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    136

    “Infection/inflammation is being shown to be a trigger for cancer”

    Infection, yes; Inflammation, no.

    Remember, inflammation is a physiological response to cellular degradation or damage. I.e Inflammation is CAUSED by infection (among other things). It is often the result of necrosis of cells (rather than apoptosis which does not result in inflammation) causing lysosomal enzymes to be released into the surrounding tissue. This does not cause genetic mutation, but the cause of the inflammation often can. (sorry, cancer is my best subject! Am taking a project in it next year)

    Schoolgirls in the UK are now being given vaccines against HPV in an effort to curb cervical cancer numbers – all working in the right direction!

    As to your first question, the answer is probably yes. I assume (dangerous I know) that all funds raised for CRUK go into a big pot. However, this annual event is a massive opportunity to raise awareness of breast cancer, that men do not have an opportunity to participate in. That is sexist and wrong.

  • gabi319

    Cym:
    haha, way to take the sting out of my incredibly long rant in 26 words. To get into technicalities, cell mutation is the cause of cancer but this occurs when the cell is reproducing and becomes cancerous when it is uncontrolled. So while you need both criteria, the final answer (and at great risk of feeding your already gigantic ego) is yes, you are more correct than I.

    And then you had to steal my chance to redeem myself with your comment 137!! Must you take THAT away from me too?! ;-)

    However, I do think the male breast cancer awareness bit isn’t quite as extreme as you put it and mom’s probably more on mark. Have you been to the event? Does it actually say that men can’t participate? I can’t make any firm conclusions from where I’m sitting but the Global (not National…didn’t find out until the morning of, haha) Race for the Cure I went to this past weekend was predominantly focusing on women but they did stress the fact that men get breast cancer too in their literature as well as included a few male testimonials in their video montages. Walking around, I saw a few groups holding signs saying something like “Men get breast cancer too!” with pictures of loved ones passed or currently battling cancer. Not saying it’s right that men don’t get equal footing but simply pointing out that the ratio of men to women with breast cancer is overwhelmingly one-sided.

    And if it helps any, the official breast cancer ribbon color (pink) was actually a masculine color prior to the 1950s.

    My issue with the Race for the Cure… the free stuff. Yes, I know… breast cancer > breast > milk > dairy. I understand the thought process, but to be surrounded by free samples of cheese, yogurt, and even drinks with some variation of dairy in them… they are very intolerant of my lactose intolerance. :-)

    Speaking of the HPV vaccine… anyone get it already? Cut off age is nearing for me. Unfortunately, things are harder/more expensive to come by when one doesn’t have health insurance… :-\

  • cymraegbachgen87

    I attended the event with my fiancee and her mother last year. Her father, an accomplished distance runner, wished to participate but was not allowed as he was in possession of a Y chromosome :)

    Feeding my gigantic ego…I like it. Now bow before my knowledge ;)

    I don’t know the specifics of the vaccination programme as it does not apply to blokes, and it is adminstered to ages 14 and up, but it begins next year I believe, and given at schools in the same way the BCG jab is administered.

    “simply pointing out that the ratio of men to women with breast cancer is overwhelmingly one-sided.”

    I completely agree that it is more a female than male problem. However, women are regularly told to examine themselves, and breast cancer is very well campaigned for for women. I would hesitate to proffer numbers, as I do not know them, but I predict that mortality percentages are probably higher for men than women (they are in cancer in general) for breast cancer as there is not the awareness, and that men wait before they go to the doctors.

    “Unfortunately, things are harder/more expensive to come by when one doesn’t have health insurance…”

    The joys of living with the NHS – it isnt all bad! :)

  • cymraegbachgen87

    “To get into technicalities, cell mutation is the cause of cancer but this occurs when the cell is reproducing and becomes cancerous when it is uncontrolled.”

    “yes, you are more correct than I.”

    True, mutations are introduced during DNA replication, during interphase, at a constant rate. It is this mutation that then causes the uncontrolled cell proliferation.

    This means that it is actually just the single criteria to turn a cell into an immortal cell, and thus start along the pathway to cancer. This doesn’t mean I was more correct than you! You were just one step further along. Don’t be so hard on yourself. I was a little more precise than you but we were both equally correct. (That came across as frightfully arrogant but that wasn’t my intention!)

    Keep up the good work – the list was fantastic. About time some of these misconceptions were put right!

  • cymraegbachgen87

    (To be more precise it occurs in S phase (synthesis) of Interphase)

  • TEX

    “…mutations are introduced during DNA replication…It is this mutation that then causes the uncontrolled cell proliferation” – ay, there’s the rub

  • GTT

    gabi319:

    “I know, I know… “How can I present published studies when all published studies are purposefully designed to thwart me?!” Not my problem…)”

    See, that´s why I like you. Funny with an attitude! ;)

  • lostatsea1

    141.Cym: I’m a layman when it comes to biology..I suffered head trauma resulting in blood clots in my ears..these finally drained down left side of neck..few months later,sore throat and coughing blood..dentist notices a ‘fistule’ at site of drainage..then cancerous growths in same region..Query..when ones immune system suffers trauma and shock stress, can that cause the ‘immortal cell’ creation?

  • katerina

    dear cym,
    be more moderate before anouncing that cancer is your best subject because you didn’t get it really well. I’m a PhD student and my thesis is “Inflammation and Cancer”. Your sayings “Remember, inflammation is a physiological response to cellular degradation or damage. I.e Inflammation is CAUSED by infection (among other things). It is often the result of necrosis of cells (rather than apoptosis which does not result in inflammation) causing lysosomal enzymes to be released into the surrounding tissue. This does not cause genetic mutation, but the cause of the inflammation often can. (sorry, cancer is my best subject! Am taking a project in it next year)” are misleading. Inflammation is caused by infection but it can also be caused by cancer itself, as there are plenty of cancer types which are IMMUNOGENIC i.e. they cause INFLAMMATION. It is true that necrosis can cause it but when it happens, when necrosis-drived inflammation is triggered, pathways of apoptotic death are also activated. Furthermore when you have inflammation, apart from lysosomal enzymes you have cytokines which trigger a wide array of cellular pathways. Keep that.
    Mutations are really often in our cells but the cell has always a way to face them. There are mechanisms correcting the “mistakes” that occur. BUT when you have inflammatory (not infected) environment, these cytokines might trigger pathways that inhibit the correction mechanisms of the cells. This means than an otherwise naive “daily” mutation can lead to uncontroled growth.Which means that inflammation CAN CAUSE cancer.

  • katerina

    furthermore, inflammation leads to the production of ROS=Reactive Oxugen Species. This is one of the most widely known trigger of DNA mutations. Infllammation causing cancer again. ROS is produced in order to fight the enemy when inflammation occurs, but it might also mutate the non-enemy, autologous,healthy cells

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Katerina,

    I am glad to hear you are researching cancer at a high level! Who is sponsering your PhD?

    It seems from your post that english is not your first language? I commend you for that btw. However it seems that in your haste to condemn my science, you have overlooked what I actually said.

    “Inflammation is caused by infection but it can also be caused by cancer itself”

    I did allow for this by saying “Inflammation is CAUSED by infection (among other things)” You glossed over this and made it appear that I said only infection causes inflammation – anything that causes cellular damage can cause inflammation, and it is pretty safe to say that cancer causes damage! :)

    “Mutations are really often in our cells but the cell has always a way to face them.”

    I addressed this in my follow up post. Perhaps I should have been more explicit about the repair mechanisms for DNA that means that most mutations are excised, or repaired. DNA is the only macromolecule the body repairs rather than creates new from scratch when errors occur.

    This section I find misleading:

    “It is true that necrosis can cause it but when it happens, when necrosis-drived inflammation is triggered, pathways of apoptotic death are also activated”

    My apoptosis lecturer, Prof. Ifor Bowen is at the forefront of this research. He has taught us that Necrosis and apoptosis were originally difficult to distinguish as they use many similar PATHWAYS. However, Apoptosis does not lead to inflammation whereas Necrosis inevtiably does. You should know this fundamental difference as a PhD student.

    You are also misleading in your “inflammation leads to the production of ROS=Reactive Oxugen Species”

    ROS are natural by-products of oxygen metabolism, and increase under a NUMBER of conditions, including environmental stress. Free radicals are also thought to be the cause of aging. You make it sound as if ROS are ONLY produced in reaction to inflammation.

    I would like to see the publications where you have gleaned ROS causing cancer. A brief glance on Pubmed is showing me only ROS COMBATING oncogenesis or cancer cells. I may be wrong though so would be happy to look through any material you can provide me with.

    I am a little hazy on why you are drawing attention to cytokines? Can you clear that up please? It was my understanding that cytokines are used extensively in cellular communication. They are proteins, peptides, or glycoproteins – does this not make them too large to affect DNA synthesis directly? Surely the focus should be on cytokine RECEPTORS such as TNF (Tumour necrosis factor responsible for cell death)

    “be more moderate before anouncing that cancer is your best subject because you didn’t get it really well.”

    Now. Regardless of how well you assume I have grasped this subject, it doesn’t prevent it from being my BEST subject. I may be awful at all my others. Also, bear in mind, that you are taught subjects piecemeal. At this stage in my education, everything I said above was correct. I got over 70% in my Genetics and cancer related modules, so I believe I grasp it quite well. I accept that maybe you did not mean to be so condescending (it may be a language barrier) but that is how you came across.

    I was of the opinion that I had tailored my explanation to something understood by the average intelligent lay person; I try and take New Scientist as my aim, as people can understand that. I don’t think it is necessary for the purposes of this board to be explicit in the minute workings of the cell. I think you will find, however, that I can fight my corner quite well.

    I DO know my stuff, and the implication that I don’t is unjustified and unwelcome. I hope it was a misunderstanding :)

  • katerina

    “It is true that necrosis can cause it but when it happens, when necrosis-drived inflammation is triggered, pathways of apoptotic death are also activated”

    My apoptosis lecturer, Prof. Ifor Bowen is at the forefront of this research. He has taught us that Necrosis and apoptosis were originally difficult to distinguish as they use many similar PATHWAYS. However, Apoptosis does not lead to inflammation whereas Necrosis inevtiably does. You should know this fundamental difference as a PhD student.

    I didn’t say somewhere that apoptosis leads to inflammation. I said NECROSIS-drived inflammation. So I know it pretty well as a PhD student. I said that necrosis leads to inflammation and inflammation leads to apoptosis

    “Free radicals are also thought to be the cause of aging. You make it sound as if ROS are ONLY produced in reaction to inflammation.”

    I didn’t make it sound like this. YOU misunderstood. It is absolutely clear that I mean that inflammation leads to ROS production. I didn’t write exclusively, only, always or something like that. Nice try but you didn’t make it again :)

    “They are proteins, peptides, or glycoproteins – does this not make them too large to affect DNA synthesis directly? Surely the focus should be on cytokine RECEPTORS such as TNF (Tumour necrosis factor responsible for cell death”

    It is funny to ask if proteins are large to affect DNA synthesis. Do you know what is a polymerase or a transcription factor leading DNA synthesis? Proteins!!!! Enhanceosome? Have you ever heard of it? Before lecturing me about fundamentals for a PhD student, think why you took 70% in your Genetics.
    Cytokines, after binding to receptors of course, trigger pathways which activate proteins which activate other proteins which can be transcription factors, checkpoint cyclines, DNA damage response factors e.t.c. This means that cytokines affect DNA. Even if the cytokine receptors are expressed in a cell and exposed to cell membrane, if cytokines are not there, signalling will not happen. So cytokines are those who lead to the cellular outcome.

    Pubmed. The first review that I saw after my quick glance on Pubmed “Reactive oxygen species: a double-edged sword in oncogenesis.”
    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are molecules or ions formed by the incomplete one-electron reduction of oxygen. Of interest, it seems that ROS manifest dual roles, cancer promoting or cancer suppressing, in tumorigenesis.

  • katerina

    and if you studymore you will realise that your saying: ““Infection/inflammation is being shown to be a trigger for cancer”

    Infection, yes; Inflammation, no. ”

    is absolutely wrong.
    So why do you mention necrosis and apoptosis and lysosome enzymes? To support what?You say “It is often the result of necrosis of cells (rather than apoptosis which does not result in inflammation) causing lysosomal enzymes to be released into the surrounding tissue. This does not cause genetic mutation, but the cause of the inflammation often can.”
    what do you prove hear? That inflammation-which is caused by necrosis- leades to lysosomal enzyme release which cannot cause mutations a.k.a. inflammation doesn’e lead to cancer?

  • katerina

    sorry hear=here and leades=leads
    and yes you do know your stuff but you do not know what you claim about inflammation and tumorigenesis because as it seems it is not your stuff. So before feeling offended think that it would be better not to be so absolute on scientific questions. Infection yes Inflammation no is really risky to be claimed and actually, it is wrong.

  • Zloft

    @cym

    “I was of the opinion that I had tailored my explanation to something understood by the average intelligent lay person”

    can you include bees and flowers please? i find my intelligence a little lower than average today.

    smite me with your mighty knowel.. oh sorry, intelligence, my friend!

  • segues

    katerina , cym, if by some fateful chance my Schwann cell tumors ever degenerated into cancer, I would rather have cym working on a cure than katerina.
    Why?
    cym likes people. He’s funny as well as intelligent.
    From the little I’ve seen of katerina, I get the feeling that she despises people and would be happy only in a lab, far away from anything human.
    From my many experiences with doctors over the last twelve years, I can tell you that the ones I get the most out of are the ones who have the best doctor-patient relationship.

  • gabi319

    You know it’s been a while since I’ve seen a scientific discussion on LV! Kind of glad I was the catalyst. :-)

    Really interesting stuff, Katrina. But again – as with your first comment here – a lot of nitpicking (I’m not offended! In fact I do it all the time when there’s a misconception list. You should see my discourse on the history of the banana on another list :-) ). I didn’t respond to your comment about the surgery item because no one else brought it up so I assumed everyone else got my meaning, but since the opportunity has arisen… The misconception is that surgery causes cancer to spread. Of course, even with surgery, cancer can persist even afterward especially if some cancerous cells remain but the actual surgery certainly does not cause cancer growth as some would believe. That misconception is why some people refuse to undergo surgery. It’s happening even now with a family friend of ours and she basically paraphrased what I say here.

    If we went your nitpicky course to say inflammation is the cause of cancer, well then, it opens up another messy scenario. The human body is remarkably homeostatic. Inflammation does not occur at random. It has to have been caused by something else. Including addendums that inflammation is the cause of cancer would mean adding an addendum to the addendum to include the cause of the inflammation that would cause the cancer and… see where I’m getting at? The nitpicking makes things messy. The reason I was willing to concede to cym’s definition is because it is far closer to the root of cancer than mine. Yes, inflammation is indicative of cancer, and yes, unregulated cell growth is indicative of cancer HOWEVER the on-off switch for cancer is when the mutation persists. Inflammation could be a sign of cancer, but inflammation could also NOT be a sign of cancer…sheesh, this is really bad grammar, haha…(e.g. Tendonitis is inflammation of the tendons often by overuse but is not cancerous; Tonsilitis is inflammation of the tonsils often by infection but is not cancerous) and my example of unregulated cell growth could be a sign of cancer but also might not (e.g. benign tumors). See how messy this nitpicking is getting? However, I am pleased to see this scientific discussion! Care to share anything about your work?

  • gabi319

    cym – “Don’t be so hard on yourself.”
    I wasn’t. As you can see, I still refuse to say I was wrong. Merely less correct. :-)

    “Now bow before my knowledge”
    pfft :-P Not until you can go toe to toe with me in an academic decathalon and I’ve yet to see you go into lengthy discourse on color theory and its applications in oil paints to create the illusion of three dimensions on a two dimensional field all the while taking into consideration the materials used to create said oil paints because as everyone should know the translucent or opaque qualities of the medium will create a remarkable difference between the specific paint’s abilities to recreate the sfmato effect. :-P

    GTT – “Funny with an attitude!”
    Interesting you say that! My old boss used to call me ‘lazy with an attitude’! :-D I am quite proud of that description! Brag about it all the time. I really want business cards with that written on there, haha.

    Alright, just a disclaimer. He (the boss) was being sarcastic. I am by no means lazy. A while ago at work, my (current) boss noticed this blue, beaded necklace thing I wore and asked me if I made it. I said “Pshh… no! I’m too lazy to make this stuff myself!” and then I asked myself “Well WHY am I too lazy?” and thus a new obsession…I am now making my own jewelry.

  • TEX

    gabi – you’re a value/hue/saturation/chroma/intensity girl???
    SWEET

  • katerina

    Dear gabbi,
    I also got your meaning and I insist that it’s wrong. Surgery can cause spread of cancer if during operation an infection by plain bacteria occurs. Even in an operating theatre (at least in those where I have been) there are plenty of microorganisms. When patient’s part of the body where the tumor is located is exposed to microorganisms, there are cases that infections occur. This can lead to inflammation, correct? Some of the inflammatory cells recruited in the peritumoral area where the inflammation has occured, can be immature dendritic cells for example. These immature dendritic cells, when they are present in tumor areas, can be reverted even in endothelial like precursors. This means angiogenesis (Nature Medicine publication-I was member of the lab of UPENN that discovered this). So a naive infection during surgery, or an inflammation caused otherwise during operation, can lead to spread of cancer.Another example is the one mentioned at comment 15 (TruCut biopsies of some particular types of cancer (especially hepatocellular carcinoma) may indeed “seed” some cancer cells that will later develop metastases on the skin, where the TruCut needle was inserted, which is why these biopsies should always be done cautiously)So nobody can claim with certainty that “surgery certainly does not cause cancer growth as some would believe”. Futhermore if you study Nature and Nature Medicine publications you will realise that the field of inflammation causing cancer is really really hot! MRC, Wellcome Trust and other organisms invest many $$ on research on that.So yeah it is messy but interesting and important.
    Of course this doesn’t mean that someone shouldn’t do the surgery. But doctors have to be more cautious and patients have to insist on that.I really don’t be;ieve this is nitpicking. Even if one patient is protected by this information, I find it really important.
    I didn’t say that inflammation always causes cancer and do not do surgeries. I said that it can indeed be dangerous and be sure to discuss it with your doctor and ask for experienced doctors to do the operation because a trainee that is less stable can be dangerous. You see in my country, it is hghly possible to assign such an operation to a trainee.

  • katerina

    @ segues: “katerina , cym, if by some fateful chance my Schwann cell tumors ever degenerated into cancer, I would rather have cym working on a cure than katerina.cym likes people. He’s funny as well as intelligent.
    From the little I’ve seen of katerina, I get the feeling that she despises people and would be happy only in a lab, far away from anything human.”

    I respect your opinion even though you have no idea about me and how much I love people and especially patients. I’ve spent 2 days without sleeping and one week of 12hour-on the bench trying to find a chemo combination for the ovarian cancer cells of a 14 year old girl that was one of the most rare cases ?’ve ever heard of.Probably this girl will not share your opinion.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    I have to say that after my considered reposte to katerina, that was a very aggressive attack! When is 70% considered bad? It is a First class honours mark!

    “That inflammation-which is caused by necrosis- leades to lysosomal enzyme release which cannot cause mutations a.k.a. inflammation doesn’e lead to cancer?”

    I think you have shot yourself in the foot here. You have said that the inflammation is caused by necrosis. Inflammation doesn’t lead to the lysosomal release, it is the necrosis of the cells that releases the myriad of enzymes into the surrounding tissue! You have just agreed with me! In fact, your entire 149 is a post without point!

    “I didn’t make it sound like this. YOU misunderstood”

    Hmmm…I will respectfully disagree here. You have a lot to learn about tone in a piece of writing.

    “I said that necrosis leads to inflammation and inflammation leads to apoptosis”

    No you didn’t! go back and read again…In any case, I am trawling through a few books here, and (it may be because they are UG books not PG) but I cannot find mention of inflammation causing apoptosis…I CAN find Necrosis causing apoptosis, but not inflammation. Can you clear that up? (That isnt sarcasm, it is a request – most people would get that but it seems with you I have to spell things out exceptionally clearly)

    “Enhanceosome? Have you ever heard of it? ”

    Yes I have heard of it, and the replisome, and DNA Pol, and the other myriad of enzymes working in the nucleus. This is my fault. I was not clear enough – I thought I had asked a polite question for you to clarify for me. Obviously what I actually said was “attack me and try and make me look stupid” the problem, katerina, is that all you have achieved is make yourself look vindictive and arrogant. I was looking for clarification from someone who is supposedly better trained than me; that is how one learns. Don’t go in to teaching. Every direct question I asked you, you ignored in favour of attacking me. Not good debating decorum.

    “I respect your opinion”

    Unfortunately I don’t think you do. I don’t think you respect anyone’s opinion, or certainly nobody here. I gave you the benefit of the doubt and thought it was a language barrier that caused you to come off as rough, abrasive, rude and arrogant…but that is just clearly you.

    You seem hesitant to share your work? Who are you working with? Who is sponsoring your PhD. You seem very proud of it…

    “Even if one patient is protected by this information, I find it really important”

    Yes because cancer patients trawl through the annals of LV to find out what they should do. Please! The very arrogance of that ascertation!

    “You see in my country, it is hghly possible to assign such an operation to a trainee”

    Then I feel sorry for your country. Don’t lump us in with you! Your ORs sound quite filthy in their practice!

    157 – which are you, a PhD student, a chemo technician or a doctor? The reason I ask is that it is rare in this country for rare cases to be given over to a student to try and solve…

    “I’ve spent 2 days without sleeping”

    Come back when you have experienced sleep deprivation like me and segue have!

    “one week of 12hour”

    A whole week of working twelve hours! :o The very idea! I mean that is just not on in the real world is it! Grow up. My fiancee regularly works 16hour days. Your 12 hour week is pathetic in comparison.

    *sigh*

    I am really disappointed in you tbh. I was hoping for some lively academic debate from an intellectual superior in my field. It turns out that all you came here for was to bask in your own superiority…how sad. I would take my better personal skills over your slightly better knowledge any day.

    If you want a board where everyone is of PhD level in your field, I suggest you start one. I am PhD level in the Ryanodine receptor, but when people ask me about it I generalise, use metaphors and cut corners so they understand and don’t get left feeling stupid. Not everything I say is 100% scientifcally accurate, but you know what? I am fine with that; I enjoy the learning process. It is a skill I suggest you learn…rapidly.

    Now. Learn some manners or piss off.

    :) Have a nice day.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Gabi…take notes.

    THAT was a rant ;)

    Thanks for your comment btw, segue! Nice to know one is wanted! :)

    I really hope this individual bucks their ideas up, comes back and retorts in a more measured fashion, answering my queries and generally trying to be nice…Needless to say I have my doubts.

  • segues

    157 katerina:..I’ve spent 2 days without sleeping and one week of 12hour-on the bench…
    ****
    ***cym, I also laughed at these “imposing” hours! I worked, ordinarily, 16 hour days, and often longer. I can’t even count the number of days when one work day just melted into another.
    Of course, now that I’m disabled, things are a bit different, but my work ethic hasn’t changed. I’ve just rerouted it into things I am able to handle, considering my spinal cord’s condition (I *am* going to learn SCUBA before we go to Kaui at years end!).

  • lostatsea1

    159.cym: And a fine rant it was! :) Would like your opinion on my query at #144, as I find it too coincidental that the Squamouscell Carcinoma grew in the same area.
    160.segues: When I ran my business 16 hr. days were the good ones! Many’s the times I slept there, as too exhausted to go home. The main thing to remember while SCUBA diving is.. breathe! That may sound funny, but you have a normal instinct to hold your breath underwater..also every 33ft. is one atmosphere in salt water, 34ft in fresh.. meaning a dive to 66ft is 3 atu absolute or 44.1 psi. You will need a dive light to see the unbelievable colour under water as light fades quickly below 15ft. The wonders await you and the weightlessness should prove a boon to your body.. watch out for red coral and sea urchins..enjoy. :)

  • katerina

    Why are you so offended? Because I told you to be unassertive? (in fact I said more moderate which of course is wrong). Or is it that I told you not to be so absolute about a scientific questions? You were the first to doubt on my “fundamental for a PhD student” knowledge, right? That’s why you took the reply about your Genetics :) .

    My 149 post is a question. Read:
    “You say “It is often the result of necrosis of cells (rather than apoptosis which does not result in inflammation) causing lysosomal enzymes to be released into the surrounding tissue. This does not cause genetic mutation, but the cause of the inflammation often can.”
    what do you prove here? That inflammation-which is caused by necrosis- leades to lysosomal enzyme release which cannot cause mutations a.k.a. inflammation doesn’e lead to cancer?” I am asking you, why did you mention about necrosis and apoptosis. I was asking what was YOUR point.

    “Then I feel sorry for your country. Don’t lump us in with you! Your ORs sound quite filthy in their practice!”

    “Us” Who are “you?” A group of civilised people ignoring problems in other countries? You know, in case you didn’t think of it, people from my country are also reading this list.

    “furthermore, inflammation leads to the production of ROS=Reactive Oxugen Species. This is one of the most widely known trigger of DNA mutations. Infllammation causing cancer again. ROS is produced in order to fight the enemy when inflammation occurs, but it might also mutate the non-enemy, autologous,healthy cells”. Where do I say that ROS are ONLY produced in reaction to inflammation? How do I make it sound like this? Which is that weird tone that you smelled out?

    “It is true that necrosis can cause it but when it happens, when necrosis-drived inflammation is triggered, pathways of apoptotic death are also activated. ” Hmmmmm…it seems as if I say that necrosis drives inflammation and then apoptotic death is activated.

    “I CAN find Necrosis causing apoptosis, but not inflammation. Can you clear that up? ”
    I will post some references in a while, but since they are hundreds, I believe that if you search for [apoptosis inflammation] in Pubmed you can find many. Prefer the reviews.

    “You seem hesitant to share your work? Who are you working with? Who is sponsoring your PhD. You seem very proud of it” I am not proud of something. I am interested in science and in helping to find cure for cancer. Would it help you somehow to learn names and personal details?

    “Yes because cancer patients trawl through the annals of LV to find out what they should do. Please! The very arrogance of that ascertation!”
    I am telling my opinion on what they should do. I say… “be sure to discuss it with your doctor and ask for experienced doctors to do the operation because a trainee that is less stable can be dangerous. You see in my country, it is hghly possible to assign such an operation to a trainee.” Not all patients know that trainees do such operations. And sorry but I believe that people in my country and other countries with corrupted and unorganised health system have the right to know the truth!

    157 – which are you, a PhD student, a chemo technician or a doctor? The reason I ask is that it is rare in this country for rare cases to be given over to a student to try and solve…

    You can be proud about your country. A PhD student in a Medical School in my country does a lot of technician’s work and my professor is one of the specialists in molecular biology of cancer in my country and he really trusts me. So yeah rare cases are given to PhD students.

    Sorry, but someone else is pathetic…”“I’ve spent 2 days without sleeping”

    Come back when you have experienced sleep deprivation like me and segue have!

    “one week of 12hour”

    A whole week of working twelve hours! The very idea! I mean that is just not on in the real world is it! Grow up. My fiancee regularly works 16hour days. Your 12 hour week is pathetic in comparison.”

    I said that i’ve been working these hours only for this case. I’ve been working for 14 to 16 hours for many years 7 days a week, so what you say just seems funny. You can feel proud about your fiancee, but sorry to dissapoint you, you are mistaken again about what I said. I don’t care to prove you how hard I’ve been working.YOU are the one searching for approval “Gabi…take notes.THAT was a rant”.

    “Now. Learn some manners or piss off.” Teach me about manners!

    “I am fine with that; I enjoy the learning process.”lol, yes…”I DO know my stuff, and the implication that I don’t is unjustified and unwelcome. ” here it is obvious that you are enjoying learning process and you are not pissed off proven wrong!

  • katerina

    Cell Death and Differentiation (2006) 13, 1789–1801. doi:10.1038/sj.cdd.4401859; published online 20 January 2006

    A novel mechanism of CD40-induced apoptosis of carcinoma cells involving TRAF3 and JNK/AP-1 activation

    Mediators of Inflammation
    Volume 4 (1995), Article ID 614169, 11 pages
    doi:10.1155/S0962935195000020
    Apoptosis and inflammation
    C. Haanen and I. Vermes
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Medical Spectrum Twente, P.O. Box 50.000, Enschede NL-7500 KA, The Netherlands

    Potential mechanisms involved in ceramide-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer HT29 cells.
    Wang J, Lv XW, Du YG.

    Biomed Environ Sci. 2009 Feb;22(1):76-85.

    Cell Death Differ. 2008 Jan;15(1):3-12. Epub 2007 Nov 16. Links
    Molecular characteristics of immunogenic cancer cell death.Tesniere A, Panaretakis T, Kepp O, Apetoh L, Ghiringhelli F, Zitvogel L, Kroemer G.
    INSERM U848, Institut Gustave Roussy, Pavillon de Recherche 1, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, Villejuif, France.

    Apoptotic cell death is initiated by a morphologically homogenous entity that was considered to be non-immunogenic and non-inflammatory in nature. However, recent advances suggest that apoptosis, under certain circumstances, can be immunogenic. In particular, some characteristics of the plasma membrane, acquired at preapoptotic stage, can cause immune effectors to recognize and attack preapoptotic tumor cells. The signals that mediate the immunogenicity of tumor cells involve elements of the DNA damage response (such as ataxia telangiectasia mutated and p53 activation), elements of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response (such as eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha phosphorylation), as well as elements of the apoptotic response (such as caspase activation). Depending on the signal-transduction pathway, tumor cells responding to chemotherapy or radiotherapy can express ‘danger’ and ‘eat me’ signals on the cell surface (such as NKG2D ligands, heat-shock proteins and calreticulin) or can secrete/release immunostimulatory factors (such as cytokines and high-mobility group box 1) to stimulate innate immune effectors. Likewise, the precise sequence of such events influences the ‘decision’ of the immune system to mount a cognate response or not. We therefore anticipate that the comprehension of the mechanisms governing the immunogenicity of cell death will have a profound impact on the design of anticancer therapies.

  • lostatsea1

    163.katarina: Found this while trying to answer my own search for ‘trauma and cancer’..gabi319: Seems #4 is not a misconception..
    Cancer patients may harbor micrometastases which are responsible for recurrent disease. Micrometastases remain dormant as a result of a balance between tumor cell proliferation and an equivalent rate of cell death [1,2]. Surgical interventions may trigger tumor growth an effect associated with angiogenesis, cytokines and growth factors release [3]. We report a patient with non-small lung cancer who had a rapid tumor growth and recurrence at a minor trauma site of his parietal skull bone. We suggest that the phenomenon of tumor growth after trauma or surgery deserves further investigation and study.
    BMC Cancer. 2005; 5: 94.
    Published online 2005 August 4. doi: 10.1186/1471-2407-5-94.

  • katerina

    lostatsea1: “Surgical interventions may trigger tumor growth an effect associated with angiogenesis, cytokines and growth factors release [3]” this is one of the things I more or less mentioned and it is a scientific fact.
    This is a link of a review article with many interesting points http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6W85-4B4P64B-R&_user=83470&_coverDate=12%2F31%2F2003&_rdoc=1&_fmt=full&_orig=search&_cdi=6645&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_acct=C000059627&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=83470&md5=469a5aa81e7968c26824d023e09d201e#SECX11
    (Lancet Oncol. 2003 Dec;4(12):760-8.Excisional surgery for cancer cure: therapy at a cost.Coffey JC, Wang JH, Smith MJ, Bouchier-Hayes D, Cotter TG, Redmond HP.)

    if you need any help in downloading it tell me in case I can help
    there are many interesting theories on trauma and cancer. If you need any help in you research I’d be glad to help if I can

  • lostatsea1

    165.katarina: Thank you for the link.. however that pertains to surgery.. my query is; did the drain of the blood clots cause, A. the ‘fistule’ B. the Squamouscell Carcinoma C. the time between accident (late March and final diagnosis, October) to reach stage two? Any help would be gratefully acknowledged. Thanks again. :)

  • katerina

    lostatsea1
    I will refresh my memory about something to be sure and reply for sure about what I believe. I am in the middle of an experiment now, but when I’m done I will write back if I can help for sure. :) have a nice day

  • cymraegbachgen87

    I would continue to debate you, katerina, but it seems it is pointless. Where have I gained this from? Well, from your inability to see why what you have said is offensive, your english is not good enough to sense tone in a written piece (or you would realise that I am not “the one searching for approval” the quote you use to support that was sarcastic and a joke between regulars on this site). In addition you seem determined to insult and play the one-up-manship game, as well as misconstruing what I say and ignoring other bits.

    You are throwing these things at us in a desperate attempt to impress. I find that very sad, and feel sorry for you, really I do.

    “Teach me about manners!” Yes. I would. But you wouldn’t understand. I was very polite first time round which merely caused you to attack me. Why should I stand and be insulted and take it. That may be the norm where YOU come from but not here.

    “you are mistaken again about what I said.”

    When a number of people all make the same mistake, which is more likely? That a number of people are all stupid and wrong, or a single person cannot express themself eloquently enough to prevent misunderstandings?

    I shall answer that myself – it is the latter. You are not gifted enough to argue cohesively in English.

    I applaud you for trying to debate in a language that obviously is not easy for you, but nothing else. You are quite rude, abrasive and arrogant. Even Randall is better than you. You attack the list writer very aggressively, when it is obvious you could not write anything of this quality. I have enough trouble reading through your posts so a list would be laughable.

    I know you will be compelled to reply to this with some sort of statement of victory, or to attack me again. Be my guest – you are only fulfilling my predictions about you as a person.

    ““Us” Who are “you?” A group of civilised people ignoring problems in other countries?”

    You know what I find funny? If we intervene in other countries we are criticised…if we mind our own business we are criticised. No win situation. Why should a country interfere in the inner medical workings of another? O…wait…that was a question… damn…you can’t handle those. O well.

    If you had spent any time around this site you would know where I come from. You would know what language my name is in. You would also know proper debating decorum and we might have gotten on…

    Shame. Although I am glad to see my 159 was proven right.

  • katerina

    You know what I find funny? If we intervene in other countries we are criticised…if we mind our own business we are criticised. No win situation. Why should a country interfere in the inner medical workings of another?

    wow! to care about people in other countries doesn’t mean you are asked to interfere in its inner medical workings

    “you are throwing these things at us in a desperate attempt to impress. I find that very sad, and feel sorry for you, really I do.”
    to impress by claiming that inflammation can cause cancer and that you are wrong? lol That’s how you impress others in your country? By proving a sciolist wrong?

    “I have enough trouble reading through your posts so a list would be laughable.” I really do not care at all. You are the one talking about impressions. I wouldn’t write a list anyway.I believe you should be a specialist on a subject to be able to write a list about misconceptions on that field. At least I may help lostatsea1 or someone else…if I can. Please do stop debating me. You don’t say anything interesting. It’s just a loss of time.

  • gabi319

    It seems that cym’s gigantic ass has sat on every topic except for this surgery issue… fine, if I must attempt to reclarify yet again…

    No, katrina, you don’t understand. I never refuted the infection causing cancer. I am fairly familiar with the HPV and its vaccine even if I haven’t received it myself. I rarely address nitpicking because it adds another dimension to some all too brief paragraphs. I never made any absolute statements; in fact, one of my comments here even says there are no absolutes. YOU are the one creating an absolute situation in that the possibility or minority result of a situation would make the entire general statement invalid. Everything on the list is a general statement (as most lists are because it is rather hard to squeeze in a lot of information in small paragraphs. Try it yourself) and I assumed everyone would understand that. I mentioned a situation in which cyclamate caused cancer even though I wrote the statement of that it does not. Your example of surgery allowing bacteria in (which, btw, would mean the bacteria is the cause and not the surgery. Place the situation in a new location but provide the bacteria access by some other means (deep cut, car accident, etc.) and it would yield similar results. As a scientist, you should’ve known that what you wrote was an extremely wide and generalized statement) MIGHT cause tumor growth and lostatsea’s “Surgical interventions MAY trigger tumor growth” are taking individual circumstances and making that the rule for the majority.

    As it is, this particular item was a SOCIAL misconception. By that I mean a patient gets diagnosed with cancer, recommended surgery but opts not to because this will happen. Not the rare occurance that this could happen but that this WILL happen. There’s a rare chance that a blind man could get rip-roaring drunk, believe he could drive, thereby killing me in a hit and run as I cross the street. Does the POSSIBILITY that this MAY happen keep me from crossing streets? No because the GENERAL situation is that it won’t happen. As a general statement, I still stand behind what I read in MSNBC Health, CNN Health, the American Cancer Society, what was discussed in person by the number one Critical Care and General Surgeon in my region, by the Oncologist he highly recommended as well as many booklets on specific cancers that were in the oncology office. Not saying I read them all but a good bulk of it since I had plenty of free time. I am fairly sure every single booklet brought up this surgery misconception within the first ten pages.

    I’m not even going to respectfully say this: I find you obnoxious. This tenacity is admirable if you apply it to your work as a PhD student, an Chemo technician, an oncologist who deals with 14 year old ovarian cancer patients, a medical researcher, medical practicioner, and someone who apparently is high up enough in the medical chain to watch a surgery all the while dealing your one week of 12 hours. My profession requires 14-16 hour a day commitments, 5-6 days a week for months at a time doing physically demanding labor (one of the requirements for the job is being able to lift a 50lbs and I do that regularly throughout the day). Cry me an effin’ river…

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Gabi,

    Perhaps I should take notes? An excellent dressing down if I may say!

    “Not saying I read them all” Tut tut…lazy gabi… ;)

    I promised myself I wasn’t going to reply to katerina, but I find myself having to respond as yet again she has:
    1) Not responded to my questions
    2) Ignored the pieces of my post that she can’t deal with
    3)Misunderstood my tone YET AGAIN.

    “By proving a sciolist wrong?”

    I assume that was meant to read ‘socialist’ *SIGH* This shows you know nothing about me! I am a UK citizen and a stuanch supporter of the Labour party…the SOCIALIST party of the UK. Idiot. Besides, what does your socialism have to do with ANYTHING. Neither of us brought up your political allignment so why bring it up now!? A desperate attempt to discredit someone who is right I feel…makes you look paranoid.

    “wow! to care about people in other countries doesn’t mean you are asked to interfere in its inner medical workings”

    I don’t think you even understand what YOU said there. You have complained because we don’t care about your medical situation…but say we shouldn’t do anything about it…my head is spinning here. By your logic, it doesn’t matter if we give a damn or not; nothing changes.

    “I wouldn’t write a list anyway.I believe you should be a specialist on a subject to be able to write a list about misconceptions on that field.”

    Confused once again. You are saying you are an expert, and now saying you aren’t? I am getting more and more suspicious of you…

    I don’t say anything interesting? Hmmm…I would beg to differ. You are the one whose posts are verging on un readable. You are boring the laymen of this post with detailed scientific theory. You are not good for interesting debate because you cannot debate.

    Nice to see that my 168 was proven right.

    My dear you should stop posting. You are looking more ridiculous with each passing post. Read gabi’s post carefully (with an english to idiot dictionary) and you will find out that her list is excellent, and you are setting your sights too high for this site. If you cannot deal with that then I kindly suggest you disappear back to those socialist web pages that make you feel warm and safe.

    (btw gabi, am I right in saying your “work as a PhD student, an Chemo technician, an oncologist who deals with 14 year old ovarian cancer patients, a medical researcher, medical practicioner, and someone who apparently is high up enough in the medical chain to watch a surgery all the while dealing your one week of 12 hours.” is sarcastic?

    Also…”It seems that cym’s gigantic ass has sat on every topic except for this surgery issue…”

    Ahem…gigantic ass?)

  • cymraegbachgen87

    One last thing.

    “You are the one talking about impressions.”

    Get this into your thick head. I am not the only one with these impressions my dear. Myself, gabi and segue (i.e three regular posters and the most recent posters on this list) all seem to have the same impression of you.

    Now unless you are similar to one paranoid person we had on here who thought we were all the same person, that means you are outnumbered three to one.

    Logically that means that it isnt just my opinion…but fact as two independent, intelligent people have come to their own conclusions which concur with mine.

    I am practically certain you are going to come back with me having ‘misunderstood’ yet more of your post, but as I said in 168 (which you ignored) if a number of people all misunderstand the same thing, the fault most likely lies not with them, but with an individual who is not talented enough to express themselves eloquently, without leading to misunderstandings.

    To ram that home (easy lostatsea) you can’t write. That is why what you are thinking, and what you are writing aren’t the same.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    “here it is obvious that you are enjoying learning process and you are not pissed off proven wrong!”

    Another poorly constructed sentence but I get the gyst.

    I am not pissed off when proven wrong. If you could understand english well enough, you would realise I was seeking some clarification on some of your points and was hoping to learn from you.

    I was pissed off because you are a foul obnoxious arrogant individual who has all the social skills of a demented buffalo on heat – i.e. it attacks anything.

    You attacked me for no reason. Someone being incorrect needs to be corrected. I completely agree with that sentiment, and have been doing it for months on this site. But there is a difference between you and me which segue has alluded to: I like people and have a sense of humour. I give people the benefit of the doubt at first and only become as aggressive as you if they are bible thumping jesus freaks who are ignoring everything I am saying…mostly.

    You are here merely to pander to your own ego.

    That is fine…but sad. Especially seeing as you don’t do it in an amusing or entertaining way.

    Now off you pop back to your experiments/thesis/diagnoses/surgery/consultation/machines…or whatever it is you do.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    “I really do not care at all.”

    LOL

    Obviously you do care or you wouldn’t keep replying to my posts.

    I feel I am getting under your skin here…

    I think I have found a new friend!

    BTW katerina…that was what we like to call SARCASM.

  • katerina

    sciolist = One who exhibits only superficial knowledge; a self-proclaimed expert with little real understanding

  • Zloft

    “define:sciolist”. google.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Ah in that case I apologise (something you don’t understand I realise but as a bigger person I am able to recognise when I am wrong.) I assumed that it was a typo as the rest of your posts are poorly written. :)

    But I never said I was an expert – only that it was my best subject. You are the self proclaimed expert here. In fact, you are a self proclaimed expert in a number of things…Looks like your expertise hasn’t stopped you misunderstanding me…

    Thanks btw…I shall augment my lexicon with this novel locution and endeavour to deploy it in orthodox dialogue ;)

    176. thanks Zloft. I know how to use google – I merely assumed (and made an ass out of myself as usual when I assume) it was a typo – an easy mistake to make on this site as it doesnt have a preview function and posts – mine included – are often riddled with typos. I admit it was my own preconceptions about HRH katerina that lead to this as well.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Superficial: concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; not deep or penetrating emotionally or intellectually.

    You think that accurately reflects my knowledge?

    Degree level biology is not superficial by any definition of the word. Just because you are further up the education ladder than me, doesn’t necessarily make you more right or more intelligent. It just makes you older. I am teaching year 7 biology pupils that the cell is made up of a membrane, cytoplasm and a nucleus which is the ‘brain’ of the cell. That is ‘wrong’ but they believe it; does that make them stupid? No. It makes them further down the educational ladder than me.

    Seriously bach your arrogance seems to know no bounds.

    Fail. Epic Fail.

  • cybogen

    My Dad just died of this horrible disease on May 31st and its of disease of great suffering. I can only hope that a cure is found someday. I pray for the families of those who have passed on from this dreadful disease.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    Amen to that.

  • lostatsea1

    179.cybogen: My heartfelt condolences to you and your family. Hard to watch someone you love wasting away in pain and suffering.

  • Zloft

    @cym

    #147: “I was of the opinion that I had tailored my explanation to something understood by the average intelligent lay person”

    #178: “Just because you are further up the education ladder than me, doesn’t necessarily make you more right or more intelligent.”

    nice. pwned i guess.

    relax. the debate was about a scientific issue and in your latest posts you are all about how katarina addressed you, about her “manners” etc. You made it personal. You had a debate, and as far as i can see it, you were proven wrong. You are saying that katarina’s english is not good, over and over again, to prove what? Even if it is, then you should be the first to not taking her “tone” personally.

    This is not a social networking site.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    I don’t understand what you are driving at with the two quotes? Can you clarify that please?

    “You had a debate, and as far as i can see it, you were proven wrong.”

    In a number of issues I was wrong. I freely admit it. I took exception to the way this individual went about it. If you believe her tone is accidental then you, sir, are naive. I am not the only one taking it personally.

    Yes I did make it personal because she attacked my person. What is your point?

    My focus changed from the science to how she addressed me because she wasn’t answering my questions.

    As to my criticising her english, she is the one bemoaning the fact that she is being constantly misunderstood. I am trying to explain that the reason for this is her inadequate command of english for this purpose.

    This is not a social networking site? Are you sure? I shall use google to illustrate my point:

    “A social network service focuses on building online communities of people who share interests and/or activities, or who are interested in exploring the interests and activities of others”

    That seems to adequately describe many functions of this site, and the forums connected with it.

    pwned i guess.

  • cymraegbachgen87

    I do hope you aren’t quote mining. :) You have taken those quotes out of context…

    Hopefully just an oversight, and if you can clarify what you are driving at with them that would be helpful.

  • katerina

    I never said I am an expert. You are making fun of my job and doubting my PhD level, remember? I know about sarcasm very well. You know why? Because I come from the country that created the term. But this was not sarcasm. It was a tragic attempt to mock me. The use of irony introduces an element of humour which may make the criticism seem more polite and less aggressive. But you cannot criticise me about my job because you don’t know anything about me and what I’m doing.

    I said I wouldn’t write a list besause I am not an expert. It needs more things than a PhD degree to be an expert. I never called my self expert or specialist. I just said that you definately are not. This doesn’t mean that I am.

    I also never called you stupid. I told you sciolist.
    “Do you think that accurately reflects my knowledge?”

    a statement must be justified, true, and believed to be called knowledge-Plato
    Your statements (e.g. comment 137) are not true, they also are not justified (because justify means just, right and valid) and they are not believed by everyone. Of course, this doesn’t mean you are stupid. You are just…sciolist :)

    “That is ‘wrong’ but they believe it; does that make them stupid?”

    Do not forget that they do not write comments in a list about cancer claiming knowledge. On the other hand…you do :)

  • katerina

    My focus changed from the science to how she addressed me because she wasn’t answering my questions.

    Can you please mention one of the scientific questions to which I haven’t replied?

  • cymraegbachgen87

    “I know about sarcasm very well. You know why? Because I come from the country that created the term”

    LOL. Just lol.

    Knowledge is a multifaceted term. So to imply I have no knowledge is daft. Knowledge can be defined as “Relevant information that one is able to recall from memory; All cognitive expectancies that an individual or organization actor uses to interpret situations and to generate activities; A specific body of knowledge of any kind, on some subject or in some field”

    Plato also said:

    “Never discourage anyone… who continually makes progress, no matter how slow.”

    And

    “The partisan, when he is engaged in a dispute, cares nothing about the rights of the question, but is anxious only to convince his hearers of his own assertions.” (something we are both guilty of I fear)

    “Do not forget that they do not write comments in a list about cancer claiming knowledge. On the other hand…you do :)”

    You have not understood why I constructed that comparison do you? Silly question. Of course you don’t or you wouldn’t have written that.

    More quote mining I fear.

  • katerina

    of course I do but you wanted to parallelise yourself to them and I just told you why you shouldn’t

  • katerina

    and you don’t seem discouraged, so you can continue making progress

  • lostatsea1

    The more I learn, only makes me realize the vastness of my ignorance! ;)

  • cybogen

    lostatsea1 – Thank-You much for your heartfelt words. I had never had a family member die before and being my first experience was extremely hard and I feel devastated but must carry on.

  • Mark

    @cybogen (191): Lucky person, I had to go to two family member’s funerals before I turned 10 :|

  • segues

    cybogen, I’m very sorry for the loss of your father to that horrid disease. I lost my own dad to cancer also, to multiple myeloma.
    I have a disease called schwannomatosis in which schwann cell tumors grow on and around, enclosing the nerve root, nerve sheathe, and peripheral nerve bundle. Naturally, they put enormous pressure on the nerves. They’ll grow on any nerve, but mine have attacked my spinal nerves, from C-1 through S-5, bi-laterally, with enough growth in a couple of places to have slightly deformed the spinal cord itself. There is very little research being done on it because of it rarity, and my worry is whether or not it can degenerate into cancer.
    All I know for sure is that it was at first given an incidence the same as NF2, 1:40,000, but has been found to be far rarer, at 1: 1,700,000.
    ~sigh~ given a choice, I’d rather have won the lottery.

  • cybogen

    segues- I am very sorry for your loss of your dad. I can only assume the hurt goes on for awhile. Please be assured that my thoughts are with you too as you go through the trials of your own illness. I will pray for your recovery.

  • GTT

    @segues (160): Ah, SCUBA… One of my absolute passions! There´s not a lot to see underwater in Peru but hubby and I try to go somewhere nice at least once a year (we also try to get another certification every time we go! :) ) In fact, as a surprise, my hubby had planned that our honeymoon be spent on the GBR in Australia… Unfortunately, since he was a European passport, he forgot to check if I needed a visa… which I did… Yeah, try to swallow THAT the morning before you leave on your honeymoon… We ended up going to Mexico (Cenotes, etc) which was nice but I´m still itching for that Australian vacation!

  • mom424

    Cymraegbachen: I am in agreement with Zloft – I don’t think Katrina began by being intentionally rude – abrupt and pointed yes – but obviously, as you’ve stated repeatedly, English is not her first language. You even made a reference to her inability to debate because of this…since when does proper grammer/english become a prerequisite to argue a point of fact? I personally would like to encourage folks from other countries (not western/english speaking) to contribute more. I would be more than willing to help anyone who requires it – we also have accomplished linguists as members – anyone who requires help who speaks Dutch, French, German, or Spanish as a first language can contact me and I will arrange for some assistance.

    The fact that I was correct, without a PHD (I read voraciously), about inflammation being a trigger for cancer is just a bonus.

  • segues

    @GTT (195): I’ll be getting my certification here on the central coast of California in preparation for our annual/bi-annual vacation to Kauai.
    We always stay on Hanalei Bay, and I snorkel, but snorkeling is limited in it’s usefulness. You can’t go deep, you can’t explore as much as I would like (although last year I was following a turtle and ended up about a mile from shore!).
    I did have to consult with my doctor, but he said no problem, so I’m on track for the dream of a lifetime!
    yippeee!

  • cybogen

    Great List here!- I’d like to meet the chick in #3 if I could!

  • lostatsea1

    @segues(197) Watch out for kelp snagging your gear and the seals like to play chicken!! Have fun and dive safe. :)

  • lostatsea1

    Forgot to add.. always follow your air bubbles to the surface..not faster..most important is to remain calm at all times..

  • ARAMAAN

    health care

  • Shelob

    Essiac does help. I wish I had found it earlier. Chemo will be seen as barbaric in years to come. Avoid it at all costs.
    Eat well and do much research into alternative treatments.

  • kennypo65

    Many years ago my mother died of ovarian cancer. This was a horrible thing to go through and I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy. The worst part is she may have survived if it had been diagnosed earlier. So please ladies, get regular screenings, and remember your fathers, sons, brothers, and husbands all love you and want to keep you around.

  • Boo

    lostatsea1, what kind of cancer did you have? I just beat hodgkins lymphoma.

  • lostatsea1

    @Boo(204):Squamous cell carcinoma, stage 2.

  • lostatsea1

    As well, you may wish to visit Rick Simpson’s “Phoenix Tears” website to find … have a chance to see “Run From the Cure” produced for free distribution. …
    http://www.phoenixtearsmovie.com/

  • Matthew I

    That was the stuipdest, most uninformed, unresearched list I’ve ever read. Period.

  • Misconception: Surgery could cause cancer to spread throughout the body.

    Great to find out now.
    About 10 years ago, as a result of an MRI for a completely different reason, it was discovered that my uterus, fallopian tubes, cervix and ovaries were jammed packed with growths. They numbered in the hundreds, and the sizes were from pin sized to prune sized.
    The next day I was sitting in the office of an OB-GYN who was telling me that everything had to come out immediately, and it had to come out via an open abdomen surgery (it’s usually a closed abdomen procedure these days) so that no cancer “spores” could be spread.
    Of course, none of the growths were cancerous. But I’m left with a life long scar that I shouldn’t have!

  • dearness

    ok you guys who believe in the big conspiracy theory: comanies probably do want to actually find the cure. The cure existing would not completely stop the existence of cancer because THIS IS NOT LIKE POLIO (which, I understand still exists in third world countries but this is an example), which can be sealed away in a tube forever. "Cancer" basically means "cells gone bad", something that you can't contain in a tube or whatever. So whichever company finds the cure WILL make lots and lots and lots of money, so the conspiracy theory makes no sense, ethics or no ethics….

  • 34E

    I like how this focuses on cancer, the vast majority of the public view it as one disease and don't realize the significant difference between the types… saying you have cancer is giving as much detail as saying you have an infection.

    Fun calculation: 800 cans of diet soda a day is 50 cans an hour if you're awake 16 hours a day.

  • Pam

    Not sure if anyone has pointed this out already, but the huge amounts of chemicals fed to mice and other animals used in studies does not indicate that study results are invalid because no one would ever realistically ingest similar quantities in a similar timespan (why do members of the media and general public so readily conclude that scientists are dumbasses enough not to realize this?).

    The huge amounts are given to compensate for the lifespan differences between humans and various lab animals. The idea is to find out what happens when amounts consumed over a lifetime are consumed. If a lab animal is smaller than a human, then an appropriate equivalent for the amount is used. If it lives an average of 70-75 years fewer than a human, you give it more in a shorter period.

    So yeah, consuming typical amounts of artificial sweeteners over an average human lifespan will likely result in heightened risk for cancer, but a much better reason for shunning them is that they don’t taste good and don’t seem to contribute to healthy weight management (there are more artificial sweeteners on the markets in more products than ever, and the population is fatter than ever. There is some evidence that noncaloric sweeteners contribute to cravings and mess with your bodys ability to gauge satiety).

    Not that I’m giving up diet dr.pepper any time soon, though.

  • Spell Check

    Pam, I know that you miss a lot of calories by using artificial sweeteners, but it doesn't seem to help some people. I suspect that many people get little value from using artificial sweeteners because the body recognizes sweetness and reacts AS IF it had gotten a blast of sugar. Reverse placebo effect. I don't think that's going to hold for everyone, though, probably not even a majority.

    In the same way, cigarettes that have very low levels of tar are supposed to be useless because the smoker draws in more deeply attempting to get the same level of nicotine he's used to. In my experience that phase lasts a very short while, days to weeks.

  • Vic

    Pharmaceutical companies DON'T want a cure! They want to be like chiropractors and osteopaths, IE keep you coming back for ongoing and expensive treatments without ever resolving the problem. If they could cure you with one hit, how could they afford their boats and the private schools for their kids?
    Anyone thinking the hypocratic oath makes a shred of difference to this is living in a dreamworld.

  • Greg L

    A huge part of this list should be breast cancer awareness. Breast cancer happens to 1 out of 9 women, whereas prostate cancer affects 1 in 8 of men. 1 in 27 cases of EITHER cancers are fatal.
    Around that time of year, we turn around and see pink ribbons and pink everything everywhere and even then some.
    Both my grandfathers have been affected by prostate cancer, and one passed away from it before I was born. Whereas none of my family has ever contracted breast cancer.

    Honestly, I find it very aggravating. Simply because of the fact that nobody talks about prostate cancer. You see women on TV with tears in their eyes because they do not feel like a woman anymore due to the fact that the treatment demanded their breasts be removed. My grandfather who survived prostate cancer once told me he wanted to die because he could no longer have intercourse due to his prostate having to be removed.

    If I had a choice and gender would not come into play, honestly, bring on the breast cancer. I would much rather lose boobs over the ability to have an orgasm.

  • Cancer must be the most misunderstood sickness of the time….I hope in the future we’ll find a cure.. :)

  • Satan

    LOL Once my buddy at medical school put his cell phone in his back pocket. I asked him why, he replied: “Testicular cancer”

    I punched him in the face

    This moron is gonna be a doctor some day

  • rik

    The c.e.o’s of pharmacutical companies dont take the hipocratic oath, they worship money

  • tldr – pharmaceutical companies can’t profit off of established therapies or old patents; doctors know relatively little about physiological effects of nutrition

    The problem with #10 is that they can’t CLAIM ownership of the cure if it is in existence already. Patent law only insures that the pharmaceutical company can be the proprietary beneficiary of profits for a small period of time, usually less than 15-20 years. After that, anyone who can procure the ingredients can sell the treatment. However, I agree that that doctors would promote the treatment, except they are usually not educated in alternative therapies. This is something you learn as a college graduate with many friends who go on to become doctors. As a side note, I would like to state that many of my doctors and friends who are doctors don’t hide the fact that they have no education on the effects of nutrition because it is not part of their curriculum, secondary training or conventions. I am always surprised by how much my personal nutrition research enlightens them when I direct them to the peer reviewed journals that I have learned from. I just thought that would be part of the package!

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  • Em

    Thing is, people who take the Hippocratic oath are doctors, MDs. People who develop cures for cancer are chemists/pharmacologists. The fact that some genes that are particularly prone to mutating, thus causing cancer, have been patented so no one but the patent owners can research them shows the want of money in the industry. It’s a sad, but true fact. (Bio degree).