Show Mobile Navigation
 
Politics

10 More Frightening Fates of Modern Leaders

Back in August 2011, I submitted a list of ten frightening fates of modern leaders prior to the possible murder or execution of deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi, which was subsequently published after his death. Based on the comments of that list it is clear that several readers desired to see a second list that included not only Gaddafi, but also several others, as well as links to images of their frightening fates. I am willing to comply with that request and, once again, must point out that not all of the men listed below are necessarily villains who merited their deaths by non-natural causes, but I am curious which ones you readers think did deserve the violence inflicted upon them described below and if so, why? Again, I want to point out that by “leader,” I am using that term broadly and therefore beyond just heads of state, because people can lead others as heads of businesses or other organizations as well and in that capacity can also have incredible influence.

Moreover, while including the sons, brother and wife of some individuals on this and the previous list may seem redundant, it is important to keep in mind that they played leadership roles in different capacities than their fathers, brother and husband and yet still met horrific ends. Their inclusion demonstrates the perils that even the family members of leaders can face. One need only consider the violent deaths of Caligula’s wife and daughter, as reenacted in the famous eponymous film of his life, or the brutal end of the wife and children of Nicholas II, to remember that when a reckoning comes against someone viewed negatively by a certain segment of the population, not only will the leader succumb to a potentially despicable demise, so too might his or her family. Indeed, when one accepts or takes the reigns of leadership, he or she does not only risk his or herself, but also those closest to him or her. Finally, the list is organized chronologically by death.

10

Maximilian I
6 July 1832 – 19 June 1867

Image005

Maximilian I reigned as Mexico’s president for just over three years, despite having been born in Austria. Much of his support rested upon the presence of a French army that withdrew following the conclusion of the American Civil War. Napoleon III did not want to risk opposition from a victorious veteran American army, while he also faced the rise of Prussia back in Europe. Maximilian, however, remained defiant in Mexico and, despite the pleas of various European royalists and other luminaries from Victor Hugo to Giuseppe Garibaldi that Maximilian be spared, his enemies executed him by firing squad. A rather haunting image of his body in its casket, viewable above, shows the folly of a French emperor’s unsuccessful bid to install an Austrian as Emperor of Mexico.

9

Malcolm X
19 May 1925 – 21 February 1965

Malcolm-X

Malcolm X became the assistant minister of the Nation of Islam’s Temple Number One, in Detroit in June 1953, although he did not remain a member of that organization until his death. Civil rights leader Malcolm X eventually experienced something of an epiphany on his world travels, and matured in his views of race relations as a consequence. His outstanding autobiography is a powerful and poignant telling of his experiences, that I recommend to any educated citizen of the world. Despite, or perhaps because of, his changes in outlook, one man shot him in the chest with a shotgun and two others used handguns to hit him sixteen times.


8

Robert Francis “Bobby” Kennedy
20 November 1925 – 6 June 1968

Bobby Kennedy served as a Seaman Apprentice from 1944 to 1946, an Attorney General from 1961 to 1964 and then as a Democratic Senator from New York from 1965 to 1968. He suffered a similar grim end as that of his brother, mentioned in the previous list. An excerpt from a documentary, viewable above, shows the terrible reaction of the crowd as he is assassinated by a Jordanian named Sirhan Sirhan, who opposed Kennedy’s support of Israel. The Arab-Israeli conflict remains one of the world’s most destabilizing points of tension that has violent consequences far beyond Palestine and Israel, as Kennedy’s death reminds us.

7

Robert Budd Dwyer
21 November 1939 – 22 January 1987

1987086Ad

Dwyer held numerous political offices throughout his long career, including Member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives from the Crawford County District (1965-1968), Member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives from the 6th District (1969-1970), Member of the Pennsylvania Senate from the 50th District (1971-1981), and Treasurer of Pennsylvania (1981-1987). The Republican politician was investigated and convicted for bribery, facing a maximum sentence of fifty-five years and a fine of $300,000. Instead, he committed suicide in graphic fashion. The 2010 documentary, Honest Man: The Life of R. Budd Dwyer, focuses on the tragedy.

6

Elena Ceaușescu
7 January 1916 – 25 December 1989

Elena Ceaușescu held the position of Deputy Prime Minister of Romania from March 1980 to 22 December 1989, and was known as “Mother of the Nation.” In the 1960s, she also directed the Bucharest Central Institute of Chemical Researches, and eventually received a doctorate in chemistry. She was executed alongside her husband, and in an informative documentary, depicted above, the trial and summary execution can be seen in a coherent chronology of their downfall, that elaborates on why they suffered their frightening fates.

5

Tupac Amaru Shakur
16 June 1971 – 13 September 1996

Tupac1

Tupac was an American rapper and record producer, and formed the Outlawz in late 1995, upon his release from prison. The members took their names from famous and infamous leaders and political theorists, several of whom met quite unfortunate fates, themselves. Shakur assumed a nickname based on Niccolo Machiavelli (3 May 1469 – 21 June 1527), while other members of the Outlawz styled themselves after Napoleon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821), Benito Mussolini (29 July 1883 – 28 April 1945), Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (24 September 1902 – 3 June 1989), Idi Amin (c. 1925 – 16 August 2003), Fidel Castro (born 13 August 1926), Saddam Hussein (28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006), and Muammar Gaddafi (June 1942 – 20 October 2011). Shakur was shot in the chest, pelvis, right hand and thigh, with one round ricocheting into his right lung. A coroner’s photograph viewable online depicts the horrific extent of his injuries. His death was followed less than a year later by that of the Notorious B.I.G. (21 May 1972 – 9 March 1997), with much speculation that both murders were part of an East Coast-West Coast Hip Hop Rivalry between the aptly named Bad Boy Records in the East and Death Row Records in the West.


4

Uday Saddam Hussein al-Tikriti
18 June 1964 – 22 July 2003

Uday-Hussein

Uday Saddam Hussein al-Tikriti headed the Iraqi Olympic Committee, and was alleged to have tortured and imprisoned athletes who underperformed. He and his brother died of injuries sustained in a four hour battle with American forces. His mutilated body can be seen in gruesome detail in photographs around the internet.

3

Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti
28 April 1937 – 30 December 2006

2149487389 3

Saddam Hussein Abd al-Majid al-Tikriti served as Iraq’s fifth president, from 1979 to 2003. During that time, he fought two bloody and unsuccessful wars to annex first Khuzestan and then Kuwait to Iraq. During the second war, he also attacked Israel with Scud missiles. His third war proved to be his last, as he once again faced an international coalition. Unlike in 1991, however, this second coalition sought not just his military defeat, but his downfall. In the 2003 war, he lost both of his sons in a firefight and was, himself, subsequently captured several months later. After a trial, he died by hanging, as depicted in a controversial leaked video that can be viewed here.


2

Muammar Muhammad Abu Minyar al-Gaddafi
June 1942 – 20 October 2011

Imgal-Gaddafi1

Gaddafi served as first Chairman of the Revolutionary Command Council of Libya, from 1 September 1969 to 2 March 1977, and then as Brotherly Leader and Guide of the Revolution in Libya, from 2 March 1977 to 20 October 2011. An ally of the uncrowned “last King of Scotland” Adi Amin, Gaddafi later received recognition from more than 200 African kings and traditional rulers, as King of Kings of Africa, in 2008. Beyond monarchic ambitions, both Amin and Gaddafi also had grandiose plans, yet ultimately failed in their goals of expanding their countries’ borders at the expense of their neighbors. But, whereas Amin managed to escape from Uganda when opposition to his rule grew uncontrollably fierce, Gaddafi decided to stay in Libya to fight his opponents to the bitter end. After a civil war in which perhaps tens of thousands died in less than a year’s fighting, he met his demise. His recent capture, torture and death is still unclear in its exact details as to what happened. As with Maximilian I earlier on this list, Gaddafi did not get out of his country when he had a chance, and suffered the brutality of bullets as a consequence.

1

Mutassim Billah Gaddafi
23 November 1977 – 20 October 2011

Mutassim-Gaddafi-Takes-A-Sip-Of-Water-Before-His-Death-In-Sirte-Pic-Afp-Getty-Images-696065127

Mutassim Billah Gaddafi worked as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Libyan Army, as well as Libya’s National Security Advisor. During the Libyan Civil War, he, like his father, appeared to be captured alive (above) during the battle of Sirte; however, as a later photograph shows, he died, perhaps having succumbed to wounds sustained in the battle or, as with his father, having been murdered or executed. Thus, like Saddam Hussein’s sons, he would not live to succeed his father, either. While the Arab Spring continues, one must wonder if the violent demise of the Gaddafi family will conclude the domino falling of power of many long-ruling leaders of first Tunisia, then Egypt, and ultimately Libya. Or if leaders in such countries as Syria may still yet share the fate of their Tunisian, Egyptian and Libyan counterparts? Indeed, when one considers that in just the past few years, long-reigning controversial dictators in such places as Iraq and Libya have finally fallen from power, if the days of dictators are numbered and if perhaps a chill has gone down the spine of those from Iran to North Korea as well… If so, let us hope that when their regimes fall it is not at the cost of the tens of thousands it took to depose some of the others named on this, and the previous, list.



  • majahki

    Tupac?? wtf…

    • wowantonlavey

      Yeah that was a bit of a curve ball lol. That opens a massive can of worms as to not ranking likes of buddy holly, kurt cobain, biggy smalls, john lenin etc.

      • Armin Tamzarian

        John Lenin? He was the bastard child of Vladimir Lenin and Yoko Ono?

        • fendabenda

          You probably never heard of Polpot McCartney, either? Ignorant…

    • WasabiNinja

      What you never heard of the small island nation of Tupacia?

      • miss jane

        hahaha gold

  • #5 seems to be the odd man out. All the others being related to politics in one way or the other. A good list though.

  • prakram bhushan

    There could have been more , like king of Iran,

  • Dangsthurt

    #2 should be #1 and vise versa

    • Fid

      They are chronological by date of death. Presumably since 1 and 2 died on the same day, they are chronological by date of birth.

  • asad

    Tupac. Led terrible music revolution? I doubt you’re in fact a Dr.

    • sds

      Also cool it with the dates…

  • Fid

    Ok I have to ask. What is FINS after the name of the author?

    • DanF

      Fellow of the Institute of…something

      • Fellow of the International Napoleonic Society, if I recall correctly.

        • DanF

          Touche

          • fendabenda

            It means a hybrid betwixt (yes, there is such a word, I always wondered where they kept it) a fish and a human… a man with fins!!! :)

    • fenda, I use “betwixt” all the time, hence, some find my speech odd.

      • Maggot

        What’s odd is fenda’s rather disturbing fixation with squirrels.

        • @Maggot”…fenda’s rather disturbing fixation with squirrels.”

          ****

          squirrel bashing from a “Maggot”? Really? :-D

    • Louis-Alexandre Simard

      FINS stands for the F*****g Institute of National Shitlists.

  • inconspicuousdetective

    tupac doesn’t deserve a place on this list.

    • ed h

      ….fool, please research first the definition of modern leader, then tupac shakur, then make an educated comment instead of this ignorant one

      • Anony

        His music is only liked by hip hop artists and the fans, anywhere else people will say his music is sh**, which it is.

  • pyongnyang boi

    nice list

  • Matt C

    The recording I remember about the Bobby Kennedy assassination was made by a reporter in the immediate aftermath where he was saying “get the gun… break his thumb if you have to… we don’t want another Oswald here…”

  • Arsnl

    If you included Maximilian I (admitedly i never heard of him before this so the read was nice) I also think you should have included Nicholas II.
    Sure you know you’re about to get executed. Let’s say you’re fine with that. But knowing all your kids will get executed. That must be something quite differently.

    I don’t believe killing done by the govt or society is in any way justified. But then again, since we cannot understand probabilities, ratios, time etc of course we cannot understand that revenge is useless even more so revenge against a powerless individual.

    • Interestingly enough, there are some conspiracy theories that Maximilian I. wasn’t executed but lived under a fake name in Venezuela until 1936

    • Bob

      Saying you don’t believe killing by the government or by society is in any way justified is plain rediculous. There are many situations where it would be justified. Killing Gaddafi was justified, he murdered thousands of innocent civillians, including women and children. He deserved to die. Hitler also deserved to do, and so did Hussein. “But then again, since we cannot understand probabilities, ratios, time etc” That doesn’t make any sense whatsoever. We can understand all of those things, what are you talking about?

      “Of course we cannot understand that revenge is useless even more so revenge against a powerless individual.” That is only your opinion. I guarantee a mother who’s children and entire family have been killed for no good reason whatsoever will say that revenge is extremely useful and something she would want. This world has evil people, and some evil people shouldn’t get to live inside of a jail cell for years. They don’t deserve the life they have, because they have only used it to inflict pain and suffering upon innocent people.

      • Dan

        Absolute Truth here.

        Killing done for pure retribution is understandable but controversial.

        Killing done to prevent a true monster from ever regaining power and slaughtering more is not an execution or a murder, it is a euthanization. Killing Saddam, Gaddafi and their ilk is not murdering a man, it is more akin to putting down a rabid dog that will spread mayhem and carnage wherever they may go.

        The human race is better off without certain blights upon the peace and security of good men living one second past the point where men of courage and honor find themselves capable of putting a bullet between their eyes.

  • Armin Tamzarian

    Few frightening fates on this list. A dude who blew out his brains, another few dudes who got their brains blown out without warning, one dude who wasn’t even a real leader. When I hear ‘frightening fates’, I think about people tortured and killed, or another horrible way to die, not corrupt idiots who take the easy way out.

    • realistSinPatria

      Chill out principal skinner

    • Thorlite

      SKINNER!

  • You

    To all those who are saying Tupac does not belong in this list: The title doesnt say “Political Leaders”. Surely Tupac was a leader and pioneer in rap music, right?

    • Sgt. York

      no.

    • I was confused about it at first, but he did have an influence and i am guessing that’s why the writer featured him on the list.

    • Louis-Alexandre Simard

      How was Tupac a pioneer in hip hop music. First he barely released 2 albums before his death and all the other posthumous releases were made mostly of early demos and rejected tracks. Second what new or innovating thing did he bring hip hop, and don’t tell me he was old school cuz that would only prove that you know nothing about hip hop. Third his reputation and talent are greatly overestimated which is sadly because of his nonetheless tragic death. As far as him being a modern leader wtf. What did he lead. Was ha a community organiser such as X. I’ll tell you what he lead? A t shirt selling revolution to a generation of teenagers looking for a ghetto christ figure to idol. True hip hop scholars don’t even consider his music as influential. He doesn’t rank with likes of KRS-One, Wu-Tang, Run-DMC, N.W.A, Africaa Bambatta, Kool Herc etc.

  • Sgt. York

    I still maintain that Sean “Puff Daddy” Combs had both Biggie and Tupac killed.

    • FlatEric

      Then he got away with it?

  • David

    This is my personal view, but I admire Saddam Hussein and Mad Dog Gaddafi. Yeah, say I`m a dictator apologist. I`m not. I admire Gaddafi, for the way that he refuseed to flee Libya. He didn`t flee the country like a lot of people said he would. He didn`t flee to some bunker like what the Monarchy or Government would do if the people “rose up.” and tried to overthrow them. And the way that Saddam Hussein was lynched by those thugs, and the way he mocked his executioners and showed no fear, he showed despite being a ruthless tyrant, he also proved he was a Lion. If it`d been me, I don`t think I`d have been like that. And had this been David Cameron, Nickolas Sarkozy or Obama, they`d have begged for their lives like girly men. And Kim Jong Il isn`t going to go anytime soon, because he has nuclear weapons.

    • Thomas

      So despite the fact that they murdered and tortured thousands of people doesnt matter to you? You care more about how they “mocked their executioners” and ” showed no fear”. All that means was that they showed no remorse for what they had done, and your comment is truly pathetic if you care more about a dictators image than the lives of innocent people.

      • miss jane

        That’s not what david is saying at all. I agree with him. If I were being tortured or captured or whatever, I would beg for either freedom or death, regardless of what I had done in my life.
        I think if those men were completely innocent they still would have stood defiant. David is only pointing out their determination for their cause, not that what they did was right.
        Besides, what is good or right is a point of view.

        • Bob

          Admiration is not what you should have. A certain degree of respect for their fearlessness I can understand, but admiration for dispiccable despots such as Gaddafi and Hussian is misplaced. These are incredibly remorseless people who have orderes the deaths of thousands of INNOCENT civillians, including women and children. Gaddafi for instance sent tanks and snipers to towns to fire on everything that moved, including children. The reason they were able to do those terrible things is most likely the same reason they didn’t fear their own death, they were god damn lunatics, extremely narcissistic (they probably believed they were going to evade capture) and they had very very strong beliefs. Also it helps to note they both believed they were doing good in the eyes of their god, and they both believed they were going to spent eternity in bliss for that. If you believe that hard enough, you’ll fear no executioner.

        • Bob

          No, what is good or right is not purely a point of view. We can all agree beating children to death is wrong. We can all agree saddam hussein and muammar gaddafi were terrible people because they inflicted suffering and death upon thousands of INNOCENT civillians. Innocent people suffering for no reason is always bad, and the people who cause it are always bad. If you say it’s good, you’re also a bad person.

          • qarstala

            Saddam was far from a brave man. Minutes before his execution he began asking forgiveness from a god that meant nothing to him during his political career. As he began saying the Islamic shahada but was cut off by the dropping platform. What did that say about him. Oh, and right or wrong is subjective and is a point of view.

    • Dan

      if Saddam was “lynched by thugs” then so was everyone condemned to the gallows at Nuremberg.

      The US took astounding pains to assure him a fair trial. He was found guilty on the basis of overwhelming evidence that he used chemical weapons on his own people (the kurds of the south were subjected to attack with nerve gasses) and in the war with Iran (mustard and nerve gasses), tortured and murdered dissidents and waged wars of aggression against Iran and Kuwait.

      His execution was well deserved on the basis of his war crimes alone, nevermind the brutal oppression to which his people were subjected.

  • Will Trame

    Regarding RFK: After he was shot I believe that someone shouted: “Get his f***ing gun!!! Break his hand if you got to but get his gun!!!” A pity; had Robert Kennedy lived he most likely would have won the White House and we all would have been spared the Nixon presidency and the subsequent disgrace of Watergate.

    Re; saddam hussein. It’s a shame that he wasn’t ousted from power back in 1991 following the first Gulf conflict. Had that been the case the Iraq War would have most likely been avoided.

    Good list BTW.

  • Jakeryder

    Replace Tupac with Pierre Laporte and you’ve got a good list.

    • Armadillo

      Are you from Québec?

    • mom424

      Agreed. His death, the crisis and our response to it – all a black spot in our history.

  • The_Snowdog

    I remember watching the live news conference of Bud Dwyer that took a surreal turn when he pulled out the gun from a paper bag

    He tried to calm everyone and then stuck it in his mouth and boom

    I couldn’t believe the news station didn’t cut it off but it must have been as much of surprise for them as it was for everyone there

    eerie stuff that to this day I remember like it was yesterday

    • Dan

      as Filter aptly commented, “Hey man, nice shot!”

      If only more politicians convicted of corruption had the minerals to publically kill themselves the US would be a far far better place

  • frenemy

    You add tupac but you don’t add benazir bhutto. And since when is tupac a modern leader? I’m confused. :/

  • pinkship

    Good list very interesting. You should follow this line of topics by adding top 10 ironic deaths

  • frenemy

    Actually, if america hadn’t fabricated the whole weapons of mass destruction story for oil. Maybe then iraq war could have been avoided and a lot of innocent lives could have been saved. Whichever side a life is a life but it seems the value of american lives is more than an iraqi’s or afghani’s, that’s why so many people are just ignoring the brutality that muslims.

    • haha

      uh-oh – a free and independant thiker! shut him up! he’s gonna ruin everything!

    • manikin

      yes we invaded Iraq for the oil , obviously i mean look at our extremely low gas prices pfft. we invaded Iraq cause we love war and he was talking crap. never insult a nation with a itchy trigger finger.

    • Dan

      The fact there is any doubt Iraq at some point possessed weapons of mass destruction is a total fabrication of the truth.

      Iraq used nerve gas against Iran in the Iran-Iraq war as well as mustard gas and used nerve gas (primarily Sarin and Cyclosarin) against the Kurds in the south of the country as well.

      The greatest unreported story of the war against Iraq, totally buried by the biased media, is that Sarin gas warheads have been used in IED attacks against US troops in Iraq since the war.

      The fact the dumb buggers don’t understand the components of a sarin warhead need to be mixed in-flight prior to detonation and rig them to blow up at once (burning the alcohol that is to be mixed with methylphosphonyl difluoride in the in-situ sarin production process) just means they are stupid.

      Iraq has conclusively been proven to have possessed chemical weapons by the existence of these roadside bombs containing isopropyl alcohol and methylphosphonyl difluoride.

  • oouchan

    Many deserved their fate, but others did not. Not sure how Tupac really should be included…doesn’t seem to fit in with the others. Don’t see him as a leader of anything. There are others that could have easily fit in that spot. Overall not a bad list.

    Interesting read today.

  • Jay Karlson

    Jimmy Hoffa (American Labor union leader) would have been a good candidate.

    • Maggot

      Except that his fate is unknown.

      • Dan

        Richard “the Iceman” Kuklinski claimed credit for the kill but other mafia hitmen later refuted him. It is virtually certain his Mafia ties lead to his murder

  • krypt

    Que bueno, pinche austriaco!

  • You could’ve combined the Husseins and the Ghadaffis.

    But Tupac? Seriously? Exactly what was he the “leader” of?

  • strangelove

    WTH? I don’t think Tupac is in the same league with this leaders….LOL

  • skeeter

    I actually saw the Budd Dwyer suicide live. It was on satellite and they didn’t cut away. Pretty gruesome.

  • vanowensbody

    Great list though I do not understand #5 being included?

    The video of Elena Ceau?escu and her husband being executed is terrible to watch but is (along with the recent video of the death of Gaddafi) a good example of the predictable end to most tyrants

    • Dan

      Sic Semper Tyrannis

  • tatanka

    Maximiliano was empereror of Mexico, not president.

    • Tupac? Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

      • Arsnl

        Im sure there’s a connection between this reply and the comment it was addressed to. But i just cant see it.

        And @blackskull: congratz man on your conclusion. But come on. At least the west and the us didnt depose a democratically elected leader (like it happened in Guatemala). I see this as progress :-)

        But you should have seen the amazement of french media regarding Tunisia. Now the tunisians elected an islamic party to power and the media was wtf?

  • Hoops

    Should had used Tupac Amaru II instead of Tupac Shakur. He was undobtly a leader and he faced a much more gruesome death…

  • Dusty-Lynn

    Now I know everyone has already said it, but I believe Tupac should not have been included in this list. I realize that the author gave his reasonings in the opening paragraph, but even still, he doesn’t fit.

    Including him while everyone else appears to be involved in politics in one way or another singles him out as something that doesn’t belong. It seems as though his inclusion is a pathetic grasp for comments, and it’s working. I read Listverse religiously every day and have commented once, maybe twice.

    Not to say Tupac wasn’t an influential person, a leader even, but put him on a list that makes sense with him included. A list where he can be objectively compared to others in the same industry as him.

    It was a brilliant list otherwise, and I hope to see more from Dr Matthew.

  • weegmc

    Should have noted that X was murdered by the Nation of Islam (reportedly by its current leader Farrakhan).

    And just to echo other commentators – Tupac?

    • coolidge

      Should also be noted that Malcolm X’s change of opinions on race did not occur because of his travels around the world. Rather it was the result of his pilgrimage to Mecca.

      In his letter from Mecca, among the things he wrote : ” There were tens of thousands of pilgrims, from all over the world. They were of all colors, from blue-eyed blonds to black-skinned Africans. But we were all participating in the same ritual, displaying a spirit of unity and brotherhood that my experiences in America had led me to believe never could exist between the white and non-white.

      America needs to understand Islam, because this is the one religion that erases from its society the race problem. Throughout my travels in the Muslim world, I have met, talked to, and even eaten with people who in America would have been considered ‘white’–but the ‘white’ attitude was removed from their minds by the religion of Islam. I have never before seen sincere and true brotherhood practiced by all colors together, irrespective of their color.

      You may be shocked by these words coming from me. But on this pilgrimage, what I have seen, and experienced, has forced me to re-arrange much of my thought-patterns previously held, and to toss aside some of my previous conclusions. This was not too difficult for me. Despite my firm convictions, I have always been a man who tries to face facts, and to accept the reality of life as new experience and new knowledge unfolds it. I have always kept an open mind, which is necessary to the flexibility that must go hand in hand with every form of intelligent search for truth.

      During the past eleven days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass, and slept in the same bed (or on the same rug)–while praying to the same God–with fellow Muslims, whose eyes were the bluest of blue, whose hair was the blondest of blond, and whose skin was the whitest of white. And in the words and in the actions in the deeds of the ‘white’ Muslims, I felt the same sincerity that I felt among the black African Muslims of Nigeria, Sudan, and Ghana.

      We were truly all the same (brothers)–because their belief in one God had removed the white from their minds, the white from their behavior, and the white from their attitude.

  • George Ofwona

    Tyrants are always within our midst,for a better place to live in we have to be car
    eful who we interact with in our daily lives.Awesum list mathew.

  • Bloo

    How in the hell is Tupac a modern leader? FAIL!!!

    • QueenWeiner

      He changed the way rap was and influenced many new (though some crappy) artists. So I guess you can think of him as a leader in that way.

      • Bloo

        Still has nothing to do with leadership..

      • Beej

        If that’s the case, John Lennon should be on this list as well.

  • adam

    Really? Tupac??? who checks these lists before they are posted? im a long-time reader and im getting ready to bail, the quality has been shit lately…

  • Planet Earth

    #2 i don’t agree with with everything Gaddafi did . Now let’s look at the FACTS :

    Pre -1950 Libya was one of the poorest country’s in Africa .

    Lack of food ,water , housing & roads ect….

    In 2009 Libya was DEBT FREE

    Everyone would get free electricity

    gas was around 0.47 cent / liter

    When you got married Gaddafi would gave young couples 50 000$ to buy a house and start a family .

    If you wanted to be a Farmer they would give land & equipment & Seeds

    Gaddafi was building the biggest Water irrigation system in the world .

    Before Gaddafi died he was trying to start a gold currency .

    Most people don’t know nothing cause the news they watch .

    NBC, ABC,CBS, FOX = Propaganda . Go do you’re own research , talk to people from other country’s .Now that Gaddafi is gone the first thing the U.N did was bring in the International BANK CARTEL to put the people in DEBT.

    The U.S government will say we help the people in libya , Meanwhile Syria 3500 dead civilians and the U.S still fully Supports Saudi Arabia a country were Women have almost no rights .

    Wake up people , DR Ron Paul 2012

    • Knobbus Maximus

      If he was so great why was there a popular uprising you knob.

      • Ecull336

        Why don’t you go to youtube and have a look at the rallies supporting Gaddafi which western news didn’t report on for this reason precisely, that most people would see him as evil.

  • Matt

    at the rate things are going we’ll have part III in a few more months…

  • soso

    When I saw tupac on the list it reminded me of mike myers snl sketch the one with the top ten most beautiful women. In the middle of the list he took some woman’s name and said that it was kind of a pallet cleanser. I guess that’s what tupac is to this list too.

    • mom424

      lol, nice.

    • soso… “kind of a pallet cleanser”

      ****

      Knowing Mike Meyers it could easily have been a “pallet” cleanser, but it probably was supposed to be palate cleanser…wot?

  • mom424

    Well, I do believe that there have been quite enough Tupac wtf? comments for today. Otherwise an excellent list.

    I am always upset when rule of mob supersedes rule of law; quite a few entries fall into this category. I join the listwriter in hoping that the conclusion of the Arab Spring is much less costly than the beginning.

    Both Bobby Kennedy and Malcolm X are tragedies. Bobby Kennedy a much bigger loss to the world than Jack imo. Had Malcolm X lived, I believe he would have made a giant impact on race relations. Maybe moved us ahead a lot quicker. Damn shame on both counts.

    Nice job Dr. Matt!

    • Dr. Matthew D. Zarzeczny, FINS

      Thanks! Two quick notes:

      1. I cannot believe I accidentally mistyped “president” instead of “emperor” as well as that I did not catch that when proofreading the list. I apologize for that typographical error. I hope that the moderators of the site notice that and correct the list accordingly if that is possible.
      2. Also, when I submitted the list, I had included links to images and videos of the events depicted which I hoped would be included to demonstrate just how they are horrifying. Even if dying quickly from a gunshot seems fast, it can still be frightening to the witnesses, for example. Anyway, to see the submitted version of the list, go to http://extra.listverse.com/archives/20111106-896.24-c3a45ec275b5d29cc8575952c8857325.html

      Finally, thank you for your comments and to Listverse for including another one of my lists. My students seem to get a kick out of seeing my lists show up here. :)

      Best,

      Matthew

  • HulkSmashNow

    What exactly was Tupac leader of, besides stupidity?

    • mom424

      well it’s either east coast or west coast thugs – pretty much interchangeable, ‘cept the climate.

      • Arsnl

        But what if you have one record company from florida and the other from oregon?

  • Wow.

    I guess one comment I offer immediately (a more compete and studied post will made later) is: It appears having the name Saddam Hussein is really very bad luck.

  • jfaker

    too shallow… hoping to be very informative but twas very summarized!!!

  • Sheher

    Good list.
    Iran does not work under dictatorship though. Please get your facts checked. People in Iran are far better off than you can even imagine (especially women) and this too inspite of the zillion economic sanctions levied against it.

  • Nicolelodeon

    You should have mentioned that Budd Dwyer commited suicide on national television, and the networks DID NOT cut away from it. It’s a pretty horrific video that you can find easily on the internet, but it is pretty gruesome if you decide to watch it.

  • 504KO

    I truly respect the fact that Tupac is on this list. Only those who are ignorant to his poetic nature and political views do not understand why he’s on this list. He was once a leader and voice of the youth and even after death still influences individuals.

    • ParusMajor

      If he hadn’t been killed, I would never have heard of the guy. Influential? To whom, exactly? Cop killers? “Leader and voice of the youth”, LOL, nobody knows even who he is in Europe. And nobody in Europe cares what you US ppl think. :D

  • JWynter

    They should do a top 10 shock videos list. The comments would be legendary.

  • ladeedadee

    Let us also mention Malcolm X aka el hajj malik el shabazz was a real muslim after he parted with n.o.i. And an exemplary muslim at that. I know several people who have accepted islam from reading his autobio.

  • skin2win

    i always like to express my admiration for people who strike me as intellectual betters,( to myself i mean). i might read this 5 times…as you were…

    • skin2win

      i agree with the handsome previous speaker

      • skin2win

        how could you not? sheer genious!

        • skin2win

          puttin’ it on a little thick, aren’t you?

          • skin2win

            mind your own beezwax buster! and let the man finish!

          • skin2win

            THIS COMMENT REMOVED BY AUTHOR; DON’T BELIEVE I’M AN AUTHOR??? FUCK YOU … AND YOU OWE ME A DRINK!!!

    • skin2win

      i don’t mean Me, when i say intellectual writer, i meant the original comment by Dr. Zarzeczny, but i can understand if you are wowed by my display of wordage, and usage of wordage…go ahead,… drink…

      • John

        Anyone who spells “genius” wrong can and will never be one.

  • InfiniteThoughts

    How about assasinations? Indira Gandhi assasinated by her bodyguards? Benazir Bhutto? Rajiv Gandhi.

    The list is centered around current events rather than take a long term perspective

  • coolidge

    Malcolm X’s change of opinions on race did not occur because of his travels around the world. Rather it was the result of his pilgrimage to Mecca.

    In his letter from Mecca, among the things he wrote : ” There were tens of thousands of pilgrims, from all over the world. They were of all colors, from blue-eyed blonds to black-skinned Africans. But we were all participating in the same ritual, displaying a spirit of unity and brotherhood that my experiences in America had led me to believe never could exist between the white and non-white.

    America needs to understand Islam, because this is the one religion that erases from its society the race problem. Throughout my travels in the Muslim world, I have met, talked to, and even eaten with people who in America would have been considered ‘white’–but the ‘white’ attitude was removed from their minds by the religion of Islam. I have never before seen sincere and true brotherhood practiced by all colors together, irrespective of their color.

    You may be shocked by these words coming from me. But on this pilgrimage, what I have seen, and experienced, has forced me to re-arrange much of my thought-patterns previously held, and to toss aside some of my previous conclusions. This was not too difficult for me. Despite my firm convictions, I have always been a man who tries to face facts, and to accept the reality of life as new experience and new knowledge unfolds it. I have always kept an open mind, which is necessary to the flexibility that must go hand in hand with every form of intelligent search for truth.

    During the past eleven days here in the Muslim world, I have eaten from the same plate, drunk from the same glass, and slept in the same bed (or on the same rug)–while praying to the same God–with fellow Muslims, whose eyes were the bluest of blue, whose hair was the blondest of blond, and whose skin was the whitest of white. And in the words and in the actions in the deeds of the ‘white’ Muslims, I felt the same sincerity that I felt among the black African Muslims of Nigeria, Sudan, and Ghana.

    We were truly all the same (brothers)–because their belief in one God had removed the white from their minds, the white from their behavior, and the white from their attitude. “

  • brian

    Tupac didnt lead shit. He was a puppet

  • javen

    wow, i am still disturbed by the budd dwyer youtube clip i stupidly chose to look up.

  • RJ Crow

    You didn’t mention Uday’s 15 years old son that was killed by US troops with his father and uncle..

  • ConstableDubs

    The video of Robert Budd Dwyer shooting himself is absolutely disgusting. But I have a morbid fascination with such things, so I had to watch it. Not for the faint of heart.

  • chris

    Maximilian was not a president but an emperor.

  • I wonder how many of there lives were ruined because of alcohol. Or how many of there hearts were destroyed in the blink of an eye.

  • terrible list

    FURTHERMORE, how is “getting shot” a ‘MORE FRIGHTENING’ fate?? Hell my neighbour got shot before maybe he should be on this list

    Saddam? Getting hanged is ‘a more frightening’ fate? so what is less frightening, dying in your sleep?

    • I agree that getting shot is not on my list of terribly frightening ways to go, but *how* you get shot could make a difference. Hanging has never appealed to me. There are too many rather ghastly tales of what happens to you when hung for me to consider hanging a nice fate. However, I can think of many, many more horrible, scary ways to die. Where I differ with you is dying in one’s sleep. That seems fairly lovely.

      I guess what it boils down to is whether or not you are afraid to die. I’m not, therefore the question of method is pretty academic.

  • whatever

    I think the Romanovs should have a place in this list. As should Rasputin.

    • The story of how Rasputin was (finally) killed is, indeed, horrifying. The details of the murders of the Romanovs is very sad. They and their retinue had been held captive for 18 months, during which time they believed (and their guards may have, too) that they were to eventually be freed. Even on the night of their death they acted as if they were not going to meet their death. I think that last little while, maybe a few minutes, when all of a sudden the decision they be killed, must have been awful. The betrayal would have been shocking.

  • Anonymous

    Tupac should *NOT* be on this list. Absurd. As a newcomer to Listverse, I’m curious about what kind of editing / proofreading goes into these articles. Typos seem to be rampant and content is often questionable.